Isaiah 27:4

Isaiah 27:4 DEFAULT

EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Fury is not in me.—Better, There is no wrath in me. Who will set briars and thorns before me? With war will I go forth against them; I will burn them up together. The reversal of the sentence is continued. Wrath against this vineyard has passed away from Jehovah. Should briars and thorns (symbols of the enemies of His people, as in Isaiah 9:18; Isaiah 10:17; 2Samuel 23:6-7; Ezekiel 2:6) spring up, he will do battle against them, and consume them utterly.

Benson Commentary

Isaiah 27:4-5. Fury is not in me — Namely, against my vineyard or my people; I have been displeased with them, and have chastized them, but I am not implacable toward them, and resolved utterly to destroy them, as their enemies are. Who would set the briers and thorns against me, &c. — Yet if any hypocrite in the church, false professor, or wilful sinner, shall offer to contend with me, he shall feel the effects of my fury. Or, more largely, thus: “Though fury doth not belong to me, and vengeance be called my strange work, (Isaiah 28:21,) yet if the briers and thorns, that is, the wicked and incorrigible, bid defiance to me, they will find I shall soon destroy and consume them like fire.” Or let him take hold of my strength,&c. — Rather, let such a one return to me, and make his peace with me, by unfeigned repentance and living faith, and he shall make peace with me — For I am always ready to receive returning sinners, and to pardon the truly penitent, who have recourse to me for mercy and salvation.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

27:1-5 The Lord Jesus with his strong sword, the virtue of his death, and the preaching of his gospel, does and will destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil, that old serpent. The world is a fruitless, worthless wilderness; but the church is a vineyard, a place that has great care taken of it, and from which precious fruits are gathered. God will keep it in the night of affliction and persecution, and in the day of peace and prosperity, the temptations of which are not less dangerous. God also takes care of the fruitfulness of this vineyard. We need the continual waterings of Divine grace; if these be at any time withdrawn, we wither, and come to nothing. Though God sometimes contends with his people, yet he graciously waits to be reconciled unto them. It is true, when he finds briers and thorns instead of vines, and they are set in array against him, he will tread them down and burn them. Here is a summary of the doctrine of the gospel, with which the church is to be watered every moment. Ever since sin first entered, there has been, on God's part, a righteous quarrel, but, on man's part, most unrighteous. Here is a gracious invitation given. Pardoning mercy is called the power of our Lord; let us take hold on that. Christ crucified is the power of God. Let us by lively faith take hold on his strength who is a strength to the needy, believing there is no other name by which we can be saved, as a man that is sinking catches hold of a bough, or cord, or plank, that is in his reach. This is the only way, and it is a sure way, to be saved. God is willing to be reconciled to us.

Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Fury is not in me - That is, I am angry with it no more. He had punished his people by removing them to a distant land. But although he had corrected them for their faults, yet he had not laid aside the affection of a Father.

Who would set - Hebrew, 'Who would give me.' The Septuagint renders this, 'Who would place me to keep the stubble in the field?' Great perplexity has been felt in regard to the interpretation of this passage. Lowth translates it:

'O that I had a fence of the thorn and the brier;'

evidently showing that he was embarrassed with it, and could not make of it consistent sense. The whole sentence must refer either to the people of God, or to his enemies. If to his people, it would be an indication that they were like briers and thorns, and that if his fury should rage they would be consumed, and hence, he calls upon them Isaiah 27:5 to seize upon his strength, and to be at peace with him. If it refers to his enemies, then it expresses a wish that his enemies were in his possession; or a purpose to go against them, as fire among thorns, and to consume them if they should presume to array themselves against his vineyard. This latter I take to be the true sense of the passage. The phrase 'who would set me,' or in Hebrew, 'who will give me,' may be expressed by "utinam," indicating strong desire; and may be thus paraphrased: 'I retain no anger against my people. I have indeed punished them; but my anger has ceased. I shall now defend them. If they are attacked by foes, I will guard them. When their foes approach, "I desire, I earnestly wish," that they may be in my possession, that I may destroy them - as the fire rages through briers and thorns.' It expresses a firm determination to defend his people and to destroy their enemies, unless Isaiah 27:5, which he would prefer, they should repent, and be at peace with him.

The briers and thorns - His enemies, and the enemies of his people (compare the notes at Isaiah 9:17; Isaiah 10:17). Perhaps the phrase is used here to denote enemies, because briers and thorns are so great enemies to a vineyard by impeding growth and fertility.

I would go through them - Or, rather, I would go against them in battle to destroy them.

I would burn them up together - As fire devours the thorns and briers; that is, I would completely destroy them.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

4. Fury is not in me—that is, I entertain no longer anger towards my vine.

who would set … in battle—that is, would that I had the briers, &c. (the wicked foe; Isa 9:18; 10:17; 2Sa 23:6), before me! "I would go through," or rather, "against them."

Matthew Poole's Commentary

Fury, to wit, against my vineyard, or my people; which is easily understood both from the foregoing and following verses. I have been displeased with them, and have chastised them; but I am not implacable towards them, and resolved utterly to destroy them, as their enemies are, and would have me to be.

I would go through them, I would burn them together:this is added as a reason of the foregoing clause and assertion; which may be conceived either,

1. Thus, I rather desire to contend with briers and thorns, i.e. with the wicked enemies of my church, who are thus called, Isaiah 10:17Ezekiel 28:24; and if my wrath was now kindled against them, as it is against my people, I would be furious towards them, and never leave till I had utterly consumed them; but I will deal more indulgently with my people. Which exposition seems to receive some light and strength from Isaiah 27:6-8. Or,

2. Thus, For I consider the weakness of my people, that if I should let loose my fury upon them, they could no more stand before me than briers and thorns (to which God’s people, when they fall into sin, and provoke God, are not unfitly resembled) can stand before a devouring fire, and therefore they would in an instant be utterly destroyed; which I will not do. And this consideration of man’s imbecility is elsewhere alleged as a reason of God’s indulgence, as Psalm 103:13-16Isaiah 57:16. But this I deliver with submission.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Fury is not in me,.... Against his vineyard he takes so much care of, his church and people, whom he has loved with an everlasting love; they are indeed deserving of his wrath, but he has not appointed them to it, but has appointed his Son to bear it for them, who has delivered them from wrath to come, and they being justified by his blood and righteousness, are saved from it; and though the Lord chastises them for their sins, yet not in wrath and sore displeasure; there is no wrath or fury in his heart towards them, nor any expressed in the dispensations of his providence:

who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle? either suggesting the weakness of his people, who, was he to deal with them as their sins and corruptions deserved, for which they may be compared to thorns and briers, they would be as unable to bear his wrath and fury as briers and thorns could to withstand a consuming fire; or rather intimating, that should such persons rise up in his vineyard, the church, as often do, comparable to briers and thorns for their unfruitfulness and unprofitableness, for the hurt and mischief they do, and the grief and trouble they give to the people of God, as hypocrites and false teachers, and all such as are of unsound principles, and bad lives and conversations, and which are very offensive to the Lord; and therefore, though there is no fury in him against his vineyard, the church, yet there is against those briers and thorns, wicked men, whom he accounts his enemies, and will fight against them in his wrath, and consume them in his fury; see 2 Samuel 23:6,

I would go through them: or, "step into it" (p); the vineyard, where those briers or thorns are set and grow up; the meaning is, that he would step into the vineyard, and warily and cautiously tread there, lest he should hurt any of the vines, true believers, while he is plucking up and destroying the briers and thorns; or contending, in a warlike manner, with carnal and hypocritical professors:

I would burn them together; or, "I would burn" out of it (q); that is, gather out of the vineyard the briers and thorns, and bind them up in bundles, as the tares in the parable, which signify the same as here, and burn them, or utterly destroy them; though the words may be rendered, "who will give, or set, me a brier and thorn in battle, that I should go against it, and burn it up together?", or wholly (r) and the meaning is, who shall irritate or provoke me to be as a brier and thorn, to hurt, grieve, and distress my people, to cause me to go into them, and against them, in a military way, in wrath and fury to consume them? no one shall. This rendering and sense well agree with the first clause of the verse. Jerom renders it thus, "who will make me an adamant stone?" as the word "shamir" is rendered in Ezekiel 3:9, Zechariah 7:12 and gives the sense, who will make me hard and cruel, so as to overcome my nature, my clemency, to go forth in a fierce and warlike manner, and walk upon my vineyard, which before I kept, and burn it, which I had hedged about?

(p) "gradiar in eam"; so some in Vatablus; "caute ingrediar eam", Piscator. (q) "succendam ex ea", Junius & Tremellius; "comburam illos ex ipsa", Piscator. (r) So De Dieu; and some in Vatablus; and which is approved by Noldius, who renders it in like manner, to the same sense, Ebr. Concord. Part. p. 409. No. 1671.

Geneva Study Bible

Fury {d}is not in me: who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle? I would go through them, I would burn them together.

(d) Therefore he will destroy the kingdom of Satan, because he loves his Church for his own mercies sake, and cannot be angry with it, but wishes that he may pour his anger on the wicked infidels, whom he means by briers and thorns.

Sours: https://biblehub.com/commentaries/isaiah/27-4.htm

 Context  Crossref  Comm  Hebrew 

Verse  (Click for Chapter)

New International Version
I am not angry. If only there were briers and thorns confronting me! I would march against them in battle; I would set them all on fire.

New Living Translation
My anger will be gone. If I find briers and thorns growing, I will attack them; I will burn them up—

English Standard Version
I have no wrath. Would that I had thorns and briers to battle! I would march against them, I would burn them up together.

Berean Study Bible
I am not angry. If only thorns and briers confronted Me, I would march and trample them, I would burn them to the ground.

King James Bible
Fury is not in me: who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle? I would go through them, I would burn them together.

New King James Version
Fury is not in Me. Who would set briers and thorns Against Me in battle? I would go through them, I would burn them together.

New American Standard Bible
“I have no wrath. Should someone give Me briars and thorns in battle, Then I would step on them, I would burn them completely.

NASB 1995
“I have no wrath. Should someone give Me briars and thorns in battle, Then I would step on them, I would burn them completely.

NASB 1977
“I have no wrath. Should someone give Me briars and thorns in battle, Then I would step on them, I would burn them completely.

Amplified Bible
“I have no wrath. Should anyone give Me briars and thorns in battle, I would step on them, I would set them all on fire.

Christian Standard Bible
I am not angry. If only there were thorns and briers for me to battle, I would trample them and burn them to the ground.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
I am not angry, but if it produces thorns and briers for Me, I will fight against it, trample it, and burn it to the ground.

American Standard Version
Wrath is not in me: would that the briers and thorns were against me in battle! I would march upon them, I would burn them together.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
You have no wall, but who put a tangle of thorns in you and thorns in proximity? I shall breathe on it and I shall burn it together

Brenton Septuagint Translation
There is no woman that has not taken hold of it; who will set me to watch stubble in the field? because of this enemy I have set her aside; therefore on this account the Lord has done all that he appointed.

Contemporary English Version
I am no longer angry. But if it produces thorns, I will go to war against it and burn it to the ground.

Douay-Rheims Bible
There is no indignation in m: who shall make me a thorn and a brier in battle: shall march against it, shall I set it on fire together?

English Revised Version
Fury is not in me: would that the briers and thorns were against me in battle! I would march upon them, I would burn them together.

Good News Translation
I am no longer angry with the vineyard. If there were thorns and briers to fight against, I would burn them up completely.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
I am no longer angry. If only thorns and briars would confront me! I would fight them in battle and set all of them on fire.

International Standard Version
I am not angry. If only the vineyard could give me briers and thorns to battle, I would march against it, and I would burn it all up.

JPS Tanakh 1917
Fury is not in Me; Would that I were as the briers and thorns in flame! I would with one step burn it altogether.

Literal Standard Version
Fury is not in Me; Who gives Me a brier—a thorn in battle? I step into it, I burn it at once.

NET Bible
I am not angry. I wish I could confront some thorns and briers! Then I would march against them for battle; I would set them all on fire,

New Heart English Bible
Wrath is not in me, but if I should find briers and thorns, I would do battle. I would march on them and I would burn them together.

World English Bible
Wrath is not in me, but if I should find briers and thorns, I would do battle! I would march on them and I would burn them together.

Young's Literal Translation
Fury is not in Me; Who giveth Me a brier -- a thorn in battle? I step into it, I burn it at once.

Additional Translations ...

Context

The LORD's Vineyard
…3I, the LORD, am its keeper; I water it continually. I guard it night and day so no one can disturb it; 4I am notangry.If only thornsand briersconfronted Me,I would marchand trample them,I would burn themto the ground.5Or let them lay claim to My protection; let them make peace with Me—yes, let them make peace with Me.”…

Berean Study Bible · Download



Cross References

Matthew 3:12
His winnowing fork is in His hand to clear His threshing floor and to gather His wheat into the barn; but He will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire."

Hebrews 6:8
But land that produces thorns and thistles is worthless, and its curse is imminent. In the end it will be burned.

2 Samuel 23:6
But the worthless are all like thorns raked aside, for they can never be gathered by hand.

Isaiah 10:17
And the Light of Israel will become a fire, and its Holy One a flame. In a single day it will burn and devour Assyria's thorns and thistles.

Isaiah 33:12
The peoples will be burned to ashes, like thorns cut down and set ablaze.



Treasury of Scripture

Fury is not in me: who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle? I would go through them, I would burn them together.

fury

Isaiah 12:1
And in that day thou shalt say, O LORD, I will praise thee: though thou wast angry with me, thine anger is turned away, and thou comfortedst me.

Isaiah 26:20,21
Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee: hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast…

Isaiah 54:6-10
For the LORD hath called thee as a woman forsaken and grieved in spirit, and a wife of youth, when thou wast refused, saith thy God…

who would

Isaiah 9:18
For wickedness burneth as the fire: it shall devour the briers and thorns, and shall kindle in the thickets of the forest, and they shall mount up like the lifting up of smoke.

Isaiah 10:17
And the light of Israel shall be for a fire, and his Holy One for a flame: and it shall burn and devour his thorns and his briers in one day;

2 Samuel 23:6
But the sons of Belial shall be all of them as thorns thrust away, because they cannot be taken with hands:

go through.





Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Fury is not in me.--Better, There is no wrath in me. Who will set briars and thorns before me? With war will I go forth against them; I will burn them up together. The reversal of the sentence is continued. Wrath against this vineyard has passed away from Jehovah. Should briars and thorns (symbols of the enemies of His people, as in Isaiah 9:18; Isaiah 10:17; 2Samuel 23:6-7; Ezekiel 2:6) spring up, he will do battle against them, and consume them utterly.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 4.- Fury is not in me; i.e."I am not now angered against my vineyard, as on the former occasion (Isaiah 5:4-7); or at any rate my anger now is not fury." (Isaiah frequently ascribes "fury" to God, as in Isaiah 34:2; Isaiah 42:25; Isaiah 51:17, 20, 22; Isaiah 59:18; Isaiah 63:3, 5, 6; Isaiah 66:15.) Who would set the briars and thorns against me in battle?The "briars and thorns" are apparently unrighteous members of the Church, who have fallen below their privileges. God asks, "Who will set the briars and thorns in array against me?" in a tone of contempt. "Who will dare to do battle against me with such weak material?" And then he adds a forecast of the result in such a case: "I would move forward; I would burn them all together" (comp. Isaiah 10:17).

Parallel Commentaries ...


Hebrew

I am not
אֵ֣ין(’ên)
Adverb
Strong's 369: A non-entity, a negative particle

angry.
חֵמָ֖ה(ḥê·māh)
Noun - feminine singular
Strong's 2534: Heat, anger, poison

If only thorns
שַׁ֙יִת֙(ša·yiṯ)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 7898: Scrub, trash, wild growth of weeds, briers

and briers
שָׁמִ֥יר(šā·mîr)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 8068: A thorn, a gem, the diamond

confronted Me,
יִתְּנֵ֜נִי(yit·tə·nê·nî)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - third person masculine singular | first person common singular
Strong's 5414: To give, put, set

I would march
בַּמִּלְחָמָ֔ה(bam·mil·ḥā·māh)
Preposition-b, Article | Noun - feminine singular
Strong's 4421: A battle, war

and trample them,
אֶפְשְׂעָ֥ה(’ep̄·śə·‘āh)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect Cohortative - first person common singular
Strong's 6585: To stride, rush upon

I would burn them
אֲצִיתֶ֥נָּה(’ă·ṣî·ṯen·nāh)
Verb - Hifil - Imperfect Cohortative if contextual - first person common singular | third person feminine singular
Strong's 6702: To blaze

to the ground.
יָּֽחַד׃(yā·ḥaḏ)
Adverb
Strong's 3162: A unit, unitedly


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OT Prophets: Isaiah 27:4 Wrath is not in me but if (Isa Isi Is)
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Isaiah 27:4–5

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4 I have no wrath.

iWould that I had thorns and briers to battle!

I would march against them,

I would burn them up together.

5 Or let them lay hold of my protection,

let them make peace with me,

let them make peace with me.”

Read more Share



Isaiah 27:4–5 — The New International Version (NIV)

4 I am not angry.

If only there were briers and thorns confronting me!

I would march against them in battle;

I would set them all on fire.

5 Or else let them come to me for refuge;

let them make peace with me,

yes, let them make peace with me.”

Isaiah 27:4–5 — King James Version (KJV 1900)

4 Fury is not in me:

Who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle?

I would go through them, I would burn them together.

5 Or let him take hold of my strength,

That he may make peace with me;

And he shall make peace with me.

Isaiah 27:4–5 — New Living Translation (NLT)

4 My anger will be gone.

If I find briers and thorns growing,

I will attack them;

I will burn them up—

5 unless they turn to me for help.

Let them make peace with me;

yes, let them make peace with me.”

Isaiah 27:4–5 — The New King James Version (NKJV)

4 Fury is not in Me.

Who would set briers and thorns

Against Me in battle?

I would go through them,

I would burn them together.

5 Or let him take hold of My strength,

That he may make peace with Me;

And he shall make peace with Me.”

Isaiah 27:4–5 — New Century Version (NCV)

4 I am not angry.

If anyone builds a wall of thornbushes in war,

I will march to it and burn it.

5 But if anyone comes to me for safety

and wants to make peace with me,

he should come and make peace with me.”

Isaiah 27:4–5 — American Standard Version (ASV 1901)

4 Wrath is not in me: would that the briers and thorns were against me in battle! I would march upon them, I would burn them together. 5 Or else let him take hold of my strength, that he may make peace with me; yea, let him make peace with me.

Isaiah 27:4–5 — 1890 Darby Bible (DARBY)

4 Fury is not in me. Oh that I had briars and thorns in battle against me! I would march against them, I would burn them together. 5 Or let him take hold of my strength; let him make peace with me: yea, let him make peace with me.

Isaiah 27:4–5 — GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)

4 I am no longer angry.

If only thorns and briars would confront me!

I would fight them in battle and set all of them on fire.

5 Or else let them come to me for protection.

Let them make peace with me.

Yes, let them make peace with me.

Isaiah 27:4–5 — The Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

4 I am not angry,

but if it produces thorns and briers for Me,

I will fight against it, trample it,

and burn it to the ground.

5 Or let it take hold of My strength;

let it make peace with Me—

make peace with Me.

Isaiah 27:4–5 — The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

4 I have no wrath.

If it gives me thorns and briers,

I will march to battle against it.

I will burn it up.

5 Or else let it cling to me for protection,

let it make peace with me,

let it make peace with me.

Isaiah 27:4–5 — The Lexham English Bible (LEB)

4 I have no wrath.

Whatever gives me thorns and briers,

I will step forth against in battle.

I will set it on fire altogether.

5 Or let it grasp at my protection;

let it make peace with me;

peace let it make with me.”

Isaiah 27:4–5 — New International Reader’s Version (NIrV)

4 I am not angry with my vineyard.

I wish thorns and bushes would come up in it.

Then I would march out against them in battle.

I would set all of them on fire.

5 So the enemies of my people had better come to me for safety.

They should make peace with me.

I will say it again.

They should make peace with me.”

Isaiah 27:4–5 — New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (NASB95)

4 “I havenowrath.

Should someonegive Me briarsandthorns in battle,

Then I would step on them, I would burn them completely.

5 “Or let him rely on My protection,

Let him makepeace with Me,

Let him makepeace with Me.”


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90-Scond Sermon #1 - Isaiah 27:4 - David Bowden

Isaiah 27:4

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4 I have no wrath.

iWould that I had thorns and briers to battle!

I would march against them,

I would burn them up together.

Read more Share



Isaiah 27:4 — The New International Version (NIV)

4 I am not angry.

If only there were briers and thorns confronting me!

I would march against them in battle;

I would set them all on fire.

Isaiah 27:4 — King James Version (KJV 1900)

4 Fury is not in me:

Who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle?

I would go through them, I would burn them together.

Isaiah 27:4 — New Living Translation (NLT)

4 My anger will be gone.

If I find briers and thorns growing,

I will attack them;

I will burn them up—

Isaiah 27:4 — The New King James Version (NKJV)

4 Fury is not in Me.

Who would set briers and thorns

Against Me in battle?

I would go through them,

I would burn them together.

Isaiah 27:4 — New Century Version (NCV)

4 I am not angry.

If anyone builds a wall of thornbushes in war,

I will march to it and burn it.

Isaiah 27:4 — American Standard Version (ASV 1901)

4 Wrath is not in me: would that the briers and thorns were against me in battle! I would march upon them, I would burn them together.

Isaiah 27:4 — 1890 Darby Bible (DARBY)

4 Fury is not in me. Oh that I had briars and thorns in battle against me! I would march against them, I would burn them together.

Isaiah 27:4 — GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)

4 I am no longer angry.

If only thorns and briars would confront me!

I would fight them in battle and set all of them on fire.

Isaiah 27:4 — The Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

4 I am not angry,

but if it produces thorns and briers for Me,

I will fight against it, trample it,

and burn it to the ground.

Isaiah 27:4 — The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

4 I have no wrath.

If it gives me thorns and briers,

I will march to battle against it.

I will burn it up.

Isaiah 27:4 — The Lexham English Bible (LEB)

4 I have no wrath.

Whatever gives me thorns and briers,

I will step forth against in battle.

I will set it on fire altogether.

Isaiah 27:4 — New International Reader’s Version (NIrV)

4 I am not angry with my vineyard.

I wish thorns and bushes would come up in it.

Then I would march out against them in battle.

I would set all of them on fire.

Isaiah 27:4 — New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (NASB95)

4 “I havenowrath.

Should someonegive Me briarsandthorns in battle,

Then I would step on them, I would burn them completely.


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27:4 isaiah

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Isaiah 27

"I have no wrath. Should someone give Me briars and thorns in battle, Then I would step on them, I would burn them completely.
New American Standard Version

Jump to: Adam Clarke CommentaryBridgeway Bible CommentaryAlbert Barnes' Notes on the Whole BibleCalvin's Commentary on the BibleChuck Smith Bible CommentaryExpository Notes of Dr. Thomas ConstableExpository Notes of Dr. Thomas ConstableJohn Gill's Exposition of the Whole BibleMatthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Adam Clarke Commentary

Verse Isaiah 27:4. Fury is not in me - "I have no wall"] For חמהchemah,anger, the Septuagint and Syriac read חומהchomah, wall. An ancient MS. has חימהcheimah. For בהbah, in her, two MSS. read בםbam, in them, plural. The vineyard wishes for a wall and a fence of thorns - human strength and protection, (as the Jews were too apt to apply to their powerful neighbours for assistance, and to trust to the shadow of Egypt:) JEHOVAH replies, that this would not avail her, nor defend her against his wrath. He counsels her, therefore, to betake herself to his protection. On which she entreats him to make peace with her.

From the above note it appears that the bishop reads, חומהchomah, wall, for חמהchemah, anger or fury, in accordance with the Syriac and Septuagint. The letter וvau makes the only difference, which letter is frequently absent from many words where its place is supplied by the point cholem: it might have been so here formerly; and in process of time both vau and cholem might have been lost. The Syriac supports the learned bishop's criticism, as the word [Syriac] shora is there used; which word in the plural is found, Hebrews 11:30: "By faith the walls of Jericho." The bishop thinks the Septuagint is on his side: to me, it seems neither for nor against the criticism. The words in the Vatican copy are εγω πολις οχυρα, I am a fortifiedcity; which the Arabic follows: but instead of οχυρα, the CodexAlexandrinus has ισχυρα, I am a STRONG city.

The word חומהchomah, wall, is not found in any MS. in the collections of Kennicott and De Rossi, nor in any of my own MSS.

However, one of Dr. Kennicott's MSS. has חימהcheimah; but probably that which now appears to be a יyod was formerly a וvau, and now partially obliterated.

This song receives much light from being collated with that in chap. v.; and perhaps the bishop's criticism will find its best support from such a collation. In Isaiah 5:5 of that chapter, God threatens to take away the wall of his vineyard: this was done; and here the vineyard complains, I have no wall, and wishes for any kind of defense rather than be thus naked. This is the only natural support of the above criticism.

"About Tripoli there are abundance of vineyards and gardens, inclosed, for the most part, with hedges, which chiefly consist of the rhamnus, paliurus, oxyacantha," c. Rawolf, p. 21, 22. A fence of thorns is esteemed equal to a wall for strength, being commonly represented as impenetrable. See Micah 7:4Hosea 2:6.

Who would set the briers and thorns against me - "O that I had a fence of the thorn and brier"] Seven MSS., (two ancient,) and one edition, with the Syriac, Vulgate, and Aquila, read ושיתveshayith, with the conjunction וvau prefixed: Who would setthe briers and thorns. מי יתנני שמיר שית mi yitteneni shamir shayith, Who shall give me the brier and thorn, i.e., for a defense: but hear Kimchi: "Who (the vineyard) hath given me (Jehovah) the brier and the thorn instead of good grapes."

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-27.html. 1832.

Bridgeway Bible Commentary


Shameful exile and glorious return (27:2-13)

From its beginning, Israel was God’s chosen people. God compares the nation to a beautiful vineyard, which he has cared for and guarded continually (2-3). Israel’s enemies are likened to thorns and briars, and unless they repent of their wrongdoing and seek God’s forgiveness, they will suffer a fiery destruction (4-5). Israel, by contrast, will flourish like a giant tree and bring blessing to the whole world (6).
Before that can happen, however, God must deal with Israel because of its sins. The nation, in both its northern and southern kingdoms, must be punished because it has turned away from the true God to serve the false gods of its neighbours. God does not punish his people as severely as he punishes his enemies. Those nations he destroys, but his own people he only sends into captivity, so that when their sins are removed they can return to their own land (7-9).
The desolation of their homeland is a just punishment that God sends upon his rebellious people (10-11). But when their punishment is ended, they will be gathered from many places back into their land, as grain is gathered together after it has been threshed (12-13).

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Flemming, Donald C. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "Brideway Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bbc/isaiah-27.html. 2005.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Fury is not in me - That is, I am angry with it no more. He had punished his people by removing them to a distant land. But although he had corrected them for their faults, yet he had not laid aside the affection of a Father.

Who would set - Hebrew, ‘Who would give me.’ The Septuagint renders this, ‘Who would place me to keep the stubble in the field?’ Great perplexity has been felt in regard to the interpretation of this passage. Lowth translates it:

‘O that I had a fence of the thorn and the brier;’

evidently showing that he was embarrassed with it, and could not make of it consistent sense. The whole sentence must refer either to the people of God, or to his enemies. If to his people, it would be an indication that they were like briers and thorns, and that if his fury should rage they would be consumed, and hence, he calls upon them Isaiah 27:5 to seize upon his strength, and to be at peace with him. If it refers to his enemies, then it expresses a wish that his enemies were in his possession; or a purpose to go against them, as fire among thorns, and to consume them if they should presume to array themselves against his vineyard. This latter I take to be the true sense of the passage. The phrase ‘who would set me,’ or in Hebrew, ‘who will give me,’ may be expressed by “utinam,” indicating strong desire; and may be thus paraphrased: ‘I retain no anger against my people. I have indeed punished them; but my anger has ceased. I shall now defend them. If they are attacked by foes, I will guard them. When their foes approach, “I desire, I earnestly wish,” that they may be in my possession, that I may destroy them - as the fire rages through briers and thorns.’ It expresses a firm determination to defend his people and to destroy their enemies, unless Isaiah 27:5, which he would prefer, they should repent, and be at peace with him.

The briers and thorns - His enemies, and the enemies of his people (compare the notes at Isaiah 9:17; Isaiah 10:17). Perhaps the phrase is used here to denote enemies, because briers and thorns are so great enemies to a vineyard by impeding growth and fertility.

I would go through them - Or, rather, I would go against them in battle to destroy them.

I would burn them up together - As fire devours the thorns and briers; that is, I would completely destroy them.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-27.html. 1870.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

4. Fury is not in me. This verse contains excellent consolation; for it expresses the incredible warmth of love which the Lord bears towards his people, though they are of a wicked and rebellious disposition. God assumes, as we shall see, the character of a father who is grievously offended, and who, while he is offended at his son, still more pities him, and is naturally inclined to exercise compassion, because the warmth of his love rises above his anger. In short, he shews that he cannot hate his elect so as not to bear fatherly kindness towards them, even while he visits them with very severe punishments.

Scripture represents God to us in various ways. Sometimes it exhibits him as burning with indignation, and having a terrific aspect, and sometimes as shewing nothing but gentleness and mercy; and the reason of this diversity is, that we are not all capable of enjoying his goodness. Thus he is constrained to be perverse towards the perverse, and holy towards the holy, as David describes him. (Psalms 18:25.) He shews himself to us what we suffer him to be, for by our rebelliousness we drive him to severity.

Yet here the Prophet does not speak of all indiscriminately, but only of the Church, whose transgressions he chastises, and whose iniquities he punishes, in such a manner as not to lay aside a father’s affection. This statement must therefore be limited to the Church, so as to denote the relation between God and his chosen people, to whom he cannot manifest himself otherwise than as a Father, while he burns with rage against the reprobate. Thus we see how great is the consolation that is here given; for if we know that God has called us, we may justly conclude that he is not angry with us, and that, having embraced us with a firm and enduring regard, it is impossible that he shall ever deprive us of it. It is indeed certain that at that time God hated many persons who belonged to that nation; but, with respect to their adoption, he declares that he loved them. Now, the more kindly and tenderly that God loved them, so much the more they who provoked his anger by their wickedness were without excuse. This circumstance is undoubtedly intended to aggravate their guilt, that their wickedness constrains him, in some measure, to change his disposition towards them; for, having formerly spoken of his gentleness, he suddenly exclaims, —

Who shall engage me in battle with the brier and thorn?” or, as some render it, “Who shall set me as a brier and thorn?” Yet it might not be amiss also to read, “Who shall bring against me a brier, that I may meet it as a thorn?” for there is no copulative conjunction between those two words. Yet I willingly adhere to the former opinion, that God wishes to have to deal with thistles or thorns, which he will quickly consume by the fire of his wrath. If any one choose rather to view it as a reproof of those doubts which often arise in us in consequence of unbelief, when we think that God is inflamed with wrath against us, as if he had said, “You are mistaken in comparing me to the brier and thorn,” that is, “You ascribe to me a harsh and cruel disposition,” let him enjoy his opinion, though I think that it is different from what the Prophet means. (193)

Others think that God assumes the character of a man who is provoking himself to rage; as if he had said, “I do not choose to be any longer so indulgent, or to exercise such forbearance as I have formerly manifested;” but this is so forced, that it does not need a lengthened refutation. It is true, indeed, that since God is gentle and merciful in his nature, and there is nothing that is more foreign to him than harshness or cruelty, he may be said to borrow a nature that does not belong to him. (194) But the interpretation which I have given will of itself be sufficient to refute others, namely, that God complains bitterly that he will as soon fight with thorns as with his vineyard, for when he considers that it is his inheritances he is compelled to spare it.

I will pass through them in a hostile manner, and utterly consume them. These words confirm my former exposition; for the burning relates to “briers and thorns,” and he declares that, if he had to deal with them, he would burn them all up, but that he acts more gently, because it is his vineyard. Hence we infer that, if God is not enraged against us, this must be attributed, not to any merits of men, but to his election, which is of free grace. By these words, מי יתנני, ( mi yittĕnēnī,) “Who shall give me?” he plainly shews that he has just cause for contending with us, and even for destroying us in a hostile manner, were he not restrained by compassion towards his Church; for we would be as thorns and briers, and would be like wicked men, if the Lord did not separate us from them, that we might not perish along with them. If the phrase במלחמה, ( bămmilhāmāh,) in battle, which we have translated “in a hostile manner,” be connected with the question, “Who shall set me?” it will not ill agree with the meaning. (195)

(193) Bogus footnote

(194) Bogus footnote

(195) Bogus footnote

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-27.html. 1840-57.

Chuck Smith Bible Commentary

Chapter 27:

In that day ( Isaiah 27:1 )

Now what day? In the day in which God is bringing the Great Tribulation upon the earth.

In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent ( Isaiah 27:1 );

So Satan.

and he shall slay the dragon that is in the sea ( Isaiah 27:1 ).

You saw the beast coming out of the sea in Revelation having ten horns and so forth and with a mouth of a dragon, the antichrist, Satan, the power of darkness.

In that day sing ye unto her, A vineyard of red wine ( Isaiah 27:2 ).

Chapter 27 really goes back with those of twenty-six. "Now in that day sing unto her," that is, to Israel, "a vineyard of red wine."

I the LORD do keep it; I will water it every moment: lest any hurt it, I will keep it night and day. Fury is not in me: who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle? I would go through them, I would burn them together ( Isaiah 27:3-4 ).

You can't put a barbed wire to keep God out.

Or let him take hold of my strength, that he may make peace with me; and he shall make peace with me. He shall cause them that come of Jacob to take root: Israel shall blossom and bud, and fill the face of the world with fruit ( Isaiah 27:5-6 ).

Now here is just a neat little prophecy tucked in God's statement of how He's going to again bless the nation Israel. How He again is going to make them His vineyard. It's quite a contrast with chapter 5 where God speaks out the woes against His vineyard. How He had taken care of the vineyard and all but it didn't bring forth fruit. Brought forth just wild grapes, and so He let the vineyard go. Now God says the day is coming when He's going to take again His vineyard and watch over it and keep it and water it and dress it. And, "He shall cause them that come of Jacob to take root. Israel shall blossom and bud, and fill the face of the world with fruit."

Already we are seeing this prophecy fulfilled. Israel is blossoming and budding and filling the earth with fruit. Israel is the fourth largest exporter of fruit of any nation in the world. United States leads in the exporting of fruit. But Israel is the third largest fruit-exporting nation in the world. And yet it is smaller than the state of California. But not only has Israel gone into the exporting of fruit, all over Europe. Actually, there are these jumbo jets that are flying out of Tel Aviv every night to the major cities of Europe taking fruit and taking flowers.

In the wintertime you can buy fresh flowers in the flower shops throughout all of Europe. Where do they come from? They come from Israel. They grow the flowers year-round down in the Jordan Valley and they ship them out overnight on these jumbo jets to the markets of Europe. And the same with the fruit. You buy the oranges and the fruit from Israel in the markets of Europe. It is blossoming. It is budding, filling the earth with fruit and also with flowers. The interesting blossoming bud.

Hath he smitten him, as he smote those that smote him? or is he slain according to the slaughter of them that are slain by him? In measure, when it shooteth forth, thou wilt debate with it: he stayeth his rough wind in the day of the east wind. By this therefore shall the iniquity of Jacob be purged; and this is all the fruit to take away his sin; when he maketh all the stones of the altar as chalkstones that are beaten in sunder, the groves and images shall not stand up. Yet the defensed city shall be desolate, and the habitation forsaken, and left like a wilderness: there shall the calf feed, and there shall he lie down, and consume the branches thereof ( Isaiah 27:7-10 ).

In other words, the bareness that would happen to the nation Israel, which did happen. The cities were destroyed and the land was a wilderness for so long.

When the boughs thereof are withered, they shall be broken off: the women come, and set them on fire: for the people of no understanding: therefore he that made them will not have mercy on them, and he that formed them will show them no favor. But it shall come to pass ( Isaiah 27:11-12 )

They went through this barren wilderness.

But it shall come to pass in that day, that the LORD shall beat off from the channel of the river unto the stream of Egypt, and ye shall be gathered one by one, O ye children of Israel. And it shall come to pass in that day, that the great trumpet shall be blown, and they shall come which were ready to perish in the land of Assyria, and the outcasts in the land of Egypt, and shall worship the LORD in the holy mount at Jerusalem ( Isaiah 27:12-13 ).

God's regathering of His people back into the land. "





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Smith, Charles Ward. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "Chuck Smith Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/csc/isaiah-27.html. 2014.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

He would not be angry with Israel in that future day (cf. Romans 3:21-26; Romans 5:8-11), as He had been in the past. If enemies tried to damage His vineyard, He would destroy them (cf. Isaiah 5:6).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-27.html. 2012.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Fury [is] not in me,.... Against his vineyard he takes so much care of, his church and people, whom he has loved with an everlasting love; they are indeed deserving of his wrath, but he has not appointed them to it, but has appointed his Son to bear it for them, who has delivered them from wrath to come, and they being justified by his blood and righteousness, are saved from it; and though the Lord chastises them for their sins, yet not in wrath and sore displeasure; there is no wrath or fury in his heart towards them, nor any expressed in the dispensations of his providence:

who would set the briers [and] thorns against me in battle? either suggesting the weakness of his people, who, was he to deal with them as their sins and corruptions deserved, for which they may be compared to thorns and briers, they would be as unable to bear his wrath and fury as briers and thorns could to withstand a consuming fire; or rather intimating, that should such persons rise up in his vineyard, the church, as often do, comparable to briers and thorns for their unfruitfulness and unprofitableness, for the hurt and mischief they do, and the grief and trouble they give to the people of God, as hypocrites and false teachers, and all such as are of unsound principles, and bad lives and conversations, and which are very offensive to the Lord; and therefore, though there is no fury in him against his vineyard, the church, yet there is against those briers and thorns, wicked men, whom he accounts his enemies, and will fight against them in his wrath, and consume them in his fury; see 2 Samuel 23:6:

I would go through them: or, "step into it" p; the vineyard, where those briers or thorns are set and grow up; the meaning is, that he would step into the vineyard, and warily and cautiously tread there, lest he should hurt any of the vines, true believers, while he is plucking up and destroying the briers and thorns; or contending, in a warlike manner, with carnal and hypocritical professors:

I would burn them together; or, "I would burn" out of it q; that is, gather out of the vineyard the briers and thorns, and bind them up in bundles, as the tares in the parable, which signify the same as here, and burn them, or utterly destroy them; though the words may be rendered, "who will give, or set, me a brier and thorn in battle, that I should go against it, and burn it up together?", or wholly r and the meaning is, who shall irritate or provoke me to be as a brier and thorn, to hurt, grieve, and distress my people, to cause me to go into them, and against them, in a military way, in wrath and fury to consume them? no one shall. This rendering and sense well agree with the first clause of the verse. Jerom renders it thus, "who will make me an adamant stone?" as the word "shamir" is rendered in Ezekiel 3:9Zechariah 7:12 and gives the sense, who will make me hard and cruel, so as to overcome my nature, my clemency, to go forth in a fierce and warlike manner, and walk upon my vineyard, which before I kept, and burn it, which I had hedged about?

p אפשעה בה "gradiar in eam"; so some in Vatablus; "caute ingrediar eam", Piscator. q אציתנה "succendam ex ea", Junius Tremellius "comburam [illos] ex ipsa", Piscator. r So De Dieu; and some in Vatablus; and which is approved by Noldius, who renders it in like manner, to the same sense, Ebr. Concord. Part. p. 409. No. 1671.

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Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-27.html. 1999.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

The Doom of Persecutors; The Privilege of Saints.B. C. 718.

      1 In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent; and he shall slay the dragon that is in the sea.   2 In that day sing ye unto her, A vineyard of red wine.   3 I the LORD do keep it; I will water it every moment: lest any hurt it, I will keep it night and day.   4 Fury is not in me: who would set the briers and thorns against me in battle? I would go through them, I would burn them together.   5 Or let him take hold of my strength, that he may make peace with me; and he shall make peace with me.   6 He shall cause them that come of Jacob to take root: Israel shall blossom and bud, and fill the face of the world with fruit.

      The prophet is here singing of judgment and mercy,

      I. Of judgment upon the enemies of God's church (Isaiah 27:1; Isaiah 27:1), tribulation to those that trouble it,2 Thessalonians 1:6. When the Lord comes out of his place, to punish the inhabitants of the earth (Isaiah 26:21; Isaiah 26:21), he will be sure to punish leviathan, the dragon that is in the sea, every proud oppressing tyrant, that is the terror of the mighty, and, like the leviathan, is so fierce that none dares stir him up, and his heart as hard as a stone, and when he raises up himself the mighty are afraid,Job 41:10; Job 41:24; Job 41:25. The church has many enemies, but commonly some one that is more formidable than the rest. So Sennacherib was in his day, and Nebuchadnezzar in his, and Antiochus in his; so Pharaoh had been formerly, and is called leviathan and the dragon,Isaiah 51:9; Psalms 74:13; Psalms 74:14; Ezekiel 29:3. The New-Testament church has had its leviathans; we read of a great red dragon ready to devour it, Revelation 12:3. Those malignant persecuting powers are here compared to the leviathan for bulk, and strength, and the mighty bustle they make in the world,--to dragons for their rage and fury,--to serpents, piercing serpents, penetrating in their counsels, quick in their motions, and which, if they once get in their head, will soon wind in their whole body,--crossing like a bar (so the margin), standing in the way of all their neighbours and obstructing them,--to crooked serpents, subtle and insinuating, but perverse and mischievous. Great and mighty princes, if they oppose the people of God, are in God's account as dragons and serpents, the plagues of mankind; and the Lord will punish them in due time. They are too big for men to deal with and call to an account, and therefore the great God will take the matter into his own hands. He has a sore, and great, and strong sword, wherewith to do execution upon them when the measure of their iniquity is full and their day has come to fall. It is emphatically expressed in the original: The Lord with his sword, that cruel one, and that great one, and that strong one, shall punish this unwieldy, this unruly criminal; and it shall be capital punishment: He shall slay the dragon that is in the sea; for the wages of his sin is death. This shall not only be a prevention of his doing further mischief, as the slaying of a wild beast, but a just punishment for the mischief he has done, as the putting of a traitor or rebel to death. God has a strong sword for the doing of this, variety of judgments sufficient to humble the proudest and break the most powerful of his enemies; and he will do it when the day of execution comes: In that day he will punish, his day which is coming, Psalms 37:13. This is applicable to the spiritual victories obtained by our Lord Jesus over the powers of darkness. He not only disarmed, spoiled, and cast out, the prince of this world, but with his strong sword, the virtue of his death and the preaching of his gospel, he does and will destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil, that great leviathan, that old serpent, the dragon. He shall be bound, that he may not deceive the nations, and that is a punishment to him (Revelation 20:2; Revelation 20:3); and at length, for deceiving the nations, he shall be cast into the lake of fire,Revelation 20:10.

      II. Of mercy to the church. In that same day, when God is punishing the leviathan, let the church and all her friends be easy and cheerful; let those that attend her sing to her for her comfort, sing her asleep with these assurances; let it be sung in her assemblies,

      1. That she is God's vineyard, and is under his particular care, Isaiah 27:2; Isaiah 27:3. She is, in God's eye, a vineyard of red wine. The world is as a fruitless worthless wilderness; but the church is enclosed as a vineyard, a peculiar place, and of value, that has great care taken of it and great pains taken with it, and from which precious fruits are gathered, wherewith they honour God and man. It is a vineyard of red wine, yielding the best and choicest grapes, intimating the reformation of the church, that it now brings forth good fruit unto God, whereas before it brought forth fruit to itself, or brought forth wild grapes, Isaiah 5:4; Isaiah 5:4. Now God takes care, (1.) Of the safety of this vineyard: I the Lord do keep it. He speaks this as glorying in it that he is, and has undertaken to be, the keeper of Israel. Those that bring forth fruit to God are and shall be always under his protection. He speaks this as assuring us that they shall be so: I the Lord, that can do every thing, but cannot lie nor deceive, I do keep it; lest any hurt it, I will keep it night and day. God's vineyard in this world lies much exposed to injury; there are many that would hurt it, would tread it down and lay it waste (Psalms 80:13); but God will suffer no real hurt or damage to be done it, but what he will bring good out of. He will keep it constantly, night and day, and not without need, for the enemies are restless in their designs and attempts against it, and, both night and day, seek an opportunity to do it a mischief. God will keep it in the night of affliction and persecution, and in the day of peace and prosperity, the temptations of which are no less dangerous. God's people shall be preserved, not only from the pestilence that walketh in darkness, but from the destruction that wasteth at noon-day,Psalms 91:6. This vineyard shall be well fenced. (2.) Of the fruitfulness of this vineyard: I will water it every moment, and yet it shall not be overwatered. The still and silent dews of God's grace and blessing shall continually descend upon it, that it may bring forth much fruit. We need the constant and continual waterings of the divine grace; for, if that be at any time withdrawn, we wither, and come to nothing. God waters his vineyard by the ministry of the word by his servants the prophets, whose doctrine shall drop as the dew. Paul plants, and Apollos waters, but God gives the increase; for without him the watchman wakes and the husbandman waters in vain.

      2. That, though sometimes he contends with his people, yet, upon their submission, he will be reconciled to them, Isaiah 27:4; Isaiah 27:5. Fury is not in him towards his vineyard; though he meets with many things in it that are offensive to him, yet he does not seek advantages against it, nor is extreme to mark what is amiss in it. It is true if he find in it briers and thorns instead of vines, and they be set in battle against him (as indeed that in the vineyard which is not for him is against him), he will tread them down and burn them; but otherwise, "If I am angry with my people, they know what course to take; let them humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and so take hold of my strength with a sincere desire to make their peace with me, and I will soon be reconciled to them, and all shall be well." God sees the sins of his people and is displeased with them; but, upon their repentance, he turns away his wrath. This may very well be construed as a summary of the doctrine of the gospel, with which the church is to be watered every moment. (1.) Here is a quarrel supposed between God and man; for here is a battle fought, and peace to be made. It is an old quarrel, ever since sin first entered. It is, on God's part, a righteous quarrel, but, on man's part, most unrighteous. (2.) Here is a gracious invitation given us to make up this quarrel, and to get these matters in variance accommodated: "Let him that is desirous to be at peace with God take hold of his strength, of his strong arm, which is lifted up against the sinner to strike him dead; and let him by supplication keep back the stroke. Let him wrestle with me, as Jacob did, resolving not to let me go without a blessing; and he shall be Israel--a prince with God." Pardoning mercy is called the power of our Lord; let him take hold of that. Christ is the arm of the Lord,Isaiah 53:1; Isaiah 53:1. Christ crucified is the power of God (1 Corinthians 1:24); let him by a lively faith take hold of him, as a man that is sinking catches hold of a bough, or cord, or plank, that is within his reach, or as the malefactor took hold of the horns of the altar, believing that there is no other name by which he can be saved, by which he can be reconciled. (3.) Here is a threefold cord of arguments to persuade us to do this. [1.] Time and space are given us to do it in; for fury is not in God; he does not carry it towards us as great men carry it towards their inferiors, when the one is in a fault and the other in a fury. Men in a fury will not take time for consideration; it is, with them, but a word and a blow. Furious men are soon angry, and implacable when they are angry; a little thing provokes them, and no little thing will pacify them. But it is not so with God; he considers our frame, is slow to anger, does not stir up all his wrath, nor always chide. [2.] It is in vain to think of contesting with him. If we persist in our quarrel with him, and think to make our part good, it is but like setting briers and thorns before a consuming fire, which will be so far from giving check to the progress of it that they will but make it burn the more outrageously. We are not an equal match for Omnipotence. Woe unto him therefore that strives with his Maker! He knows not the power of his anger. [3.] This is the only way, and it is a sure way, to reconciliation: "Let him take this course to make peace with me, and he shall make peace; and thereby good, all good, shall come unto him." God is willing to be reconciled to us if we be but willing to be reconciled to him.

      3. That the church of God in the world shall be a growing body, and come at length to be a great body (Isaiah 27:6; Isaiah 27:6): In times to come (so some read it), in after-times, when these calamities are overpast, or in the days of the gospel, the latter days, he shall cause Jacob to take root, deeper root than ever yet; for the gospel church shall be more firmly fixed than ever the Jewish church was, and shall spread further. Or, He shall cause those of Jacob that come back out of their captivity, or (as we read it) those that come of Jacob, to take root downward, and bear fruit upward,Isaiah 37:31; Isaiah 37:31. They shall be established in a prosperous state, and then they shall blossom and bud, and give hopeful prospects of a great increase; and so it shall prove, for they shall fill the face of the world with fruit. Many shall be brought into the church, proselytes shall be numerous, some out of all the nations about that shall be to the God of Israel for a name and a praise; and the converts shall be fruitful in the fruits of righteousness. The preaching of the gospel brought forth fruit in all the world (Colossians 1:6), fruit that remains, John 15:16.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Isaiah 27:4". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/isaiah-27.html. 1706.

Sours: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/isaiah/27-4.html
Isaiah 27 (KJV)

Isaiah 27:4

Isaiah 27:4

Fury [is] not in me
Against his vineyard he takes so much care of, his church and people, whom he has loved with an everlasting love; they are indeed deserving of his wrath, but he has not appointed them to it, but has appointed his Son to bear it for them, who has delivered them from wrath to come, and they being justified by his blood and righteousness, are saved from it; and though the Lord chastises them for their sins, yet not in wrath and sore displeasure; there is no wrath or fury in his heart towards them, nor any expressed in the dispensations of his providence: who would set the briers [and] thorns against me in battle?
either suggesting the weakness of his people, who, was he to deal with them as their sins and corruptions deserved, for which they may be compared to thorns and briers, they would be as unable to bear his wrath and fury as briers and thorns could to withstand a consuming fire; or rather intimating, that should such persons rise up in his vineyard, the church, as often do, comparable to briers and thorns for their unfruitfulness and unprofitableness, for the hurt and mischief they do, and the grief and trouble they give to the people of God, as hypocrites and false teachers, and all such as are of unsound principles, and bad lives and conversations, and which are very offensive to the Lord; and therefore, though there is no fury in him against his vineyard, the church, yet there is against those briers and thorns, wicked men, whom he accounts his enemies, and will fight against them in his wrath, and consume them in his fury; see ( 2 Samuel 23:62 Samuel 23:7 ) ( Isaiah 33:14 ) : I would go through them:
or, "step into it" F16; the vineyard, where those briers or thorns are set and grow up; the meaning is, that he would step into the vineyard, and warily and cautiously tread there, lest he should hurt any of the vines, true believers, while he is plucking up and destroying the briers and thorns; or contending, in a warlike manner, with carnal and hypocritical professors: I would burn them together;
or, "I would burn" out of it F17; that is, gather out of the vineyard the briers and thorns, and bind them up in bundles, as the tares in the parable, which signify the same as here, and burn them, or utterly destroy them; though the words may be rendered, "who will give, or set, me a brier and thorn in battle, that I should go against it, and burn it up together?", or wholly F18 and the meaning is, who shall irritate or provoke me to be as a brier and thorn, to hurt, grieve, and distress my people, to cause me to go into them, and against them, in a military way, in wrath and fury to consume them? no one shall. This rendering and sense well agree with the first clause of the verse. Jerom renders it thus, "who will make me an adamant stone?" as the word "shamir" is rendered in ( Ezekiel 3:9 ) ( Zechariah 7:12 ) and gives the sense, who will make me hard and cruel, so as to overcome my nature, my clemency, to go forth in a fierce and warlike manner, and walk upon my vineyard, which before I kept, and burn it, which I had hedged about?


Sours: https://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/gills-exposition-of-the-bible/isaiah-27-4.html

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