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Kurt Stage

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Biography

Kurt Stage (* 10. Juni 1900; † 19. August 1947 in Ljubljana) war ein deutscher Polizeibeamter zur Zeit des Nationalsozialismus.

Leben und Wirken

Stage besuchte das Realgymnasium in Potsdam, das er mit der Primareife verließ. Anschließend durchlief er eine kaufmännische Lehre in Berlin. Später wurde er arbeitslos. Anfang 1926 erhielt er eine Stelle als Justizangestellter erst beim Amtsgericht in Potsdam, dann in Schöneberg, wo er bis Mitte der 1930er Jahre blieb.

Nach eigenen Angaben trat er im Jahr 1922 der NSDAP bei. Seine Mitgliedskarte vermerkt allerdings das Eintrittsdatum 23. Oktober 1925 und die Mitgliedsnummer 27.171.

Seit 1932 war Stage für den Sicherheitsdienst der SS tätig. 1935 kam er vom Amtsgericht in Schöneberg zur Gestapo. Nach der Ausbildung zum Kriminalkommissar war er im Gestaporeferat „Angelegenheiten der NSDAP und ihrer Gliederungen“ unter Josef Meisinger tätig. Später übernahm er die Leitung desselben Referates – Referat IV C 4 (Angelegenheiten der Partei und ihrer Gliederungen) – im Amt IV (Gestapo) des neugegründeten Reichssicherheitshauptamtes. Später wurde er zu Auslandseinsätzen abkommandiert: zuerst von Herbst 1942 bis März oder Mai 1944 als KdS im Rang eines Sturmbannführers in Tromsø in Norwegen dann als KdS in Maribor (Marburg an der Drau) in Jugoslawien.

Nach dem Krieg wurde Stage von den Alliierten interniert und an die jugoslawische Regierung ausgeliefert. Am 10. Juni 1947 wurde er von einem Kriegsgericht in Celje zum Tode verurteilt und im August 1947 hingerichtet.

Filme

Literatur

  • Michael Wildt: Generation des Unbedingten. Das Führungskorps des Reichssicherheitshauptamtes, 2002.
The contents of this page are sourced from Wikipedia article on 17 Mar 2020. The contents are available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

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Operation Martin
Part of World War II
DateMarch 1943
LocationRebbenesøya, Norway
Result The vessel lowered. Crew and soldiers executed. Mission failed.
Belligerents
 Norway Nazi Germany
Strength
12 Company Linge R56 and Gestapo
Casualties and losses
11 1

Operation Martin (Red) was an AlliedWorld War IIclandestine operation aimed at destroying a German air control tower at Bardufoss. It was also tasked with organizing secret military resistance groups in Tromsø in German-occupied Norway in 1943. The operation consisted of twelve Norwegian nationals under Company Linge group, who had been trained by British in Scotland and returned to Norway in March 1943. This mission was compromised when the Norwegian operatives seeking a trusted local resistance contact, accidentally made contact with an unaligned civilian shopkeeper with the same name as their contact. The civilian reported them to the Germans. The escape failed when the group's vessel MK "Bratholm I" was discovered and attacked by the German frigate Räumboot R56. To escape, the MK "Bratholm I" was scuttled by its own Norwegian crew. An 8-ton explosive was detonated using a time delay fuse. The crew fled in a small boat, which was promptly sunk by the Germans. Eleven Norwegian soldiers from the Company Linge died, one was shot on site while ten were captured, interrogated by the Gestapo, and executed in Tromsø. Only one person managed to flee over from Rebbenesøya to Sweden, a neutral country. The survivor was Jan Baalsrud. His three-month escape was made through Lyngen and Manndalen with the help of local villagers.

Operation Members[]

  • Løytnant Sigurd Eskeland
  • FenrikJan Baalsrud
  • Fenrik Per Blindheim
  • Kaptein Sverre Odd Kverhellen
  • Erik Reichelt
  • Harald Peter Ratvik
  • Bjørn Normann Bolstad
  • Gabriel Salvesen
  • Magnus Johan Kvalvik
  • Frithjof M. Haugland
  • Sjur Ludvigsen Trovaag
  • Alfred A. Vik

Posting[]

The executions of the prisoners in Tromsø were investigated after the war under the case of Toftefjordsaken.

The Gestapo officers who tortured and executed eight of the MK "Bratholm 1" crew were ordered in the late summer of 1945 to dig the bodies from the mass grave at Grønnåsen Skytebane. First with spades, hand to hand, not to damage the bodies. They also had to wash their bodies before placing them in chests.

The prosecution after the war became problematic as the main target, Kurt Stage, was not in Norwegian custody. Stage was executed in 1947 in Yugoslavia for war crimes there, while no criminal proceedings were brought against the four others who were charged in the case.[1]

In popular culture[]

Two films have been made based on Operation Martin, the 1957 Ni Liv (Nine Lives) and the 2017 Den 12. Mann (The 12th Man). The latter directed by Norwegian director, Harald Zwart, and starring Thomas Gullestad and Jonathan Rhys Meyers.[2]

References[]

External links[]

Sours: https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Operation_Martin
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The 12th Man (film)

2017 Norwegian WW2 drama film directed by Harald Zwart

The 12th Man (Norwegian: Den 12. mann) is a 2017 Norwegian historical drama film directed by Harald Zwart, starring Thomas Gullestad as Jan Baalsrud, who escapes from occupying Nazi Germans in Rebbenesøya, via Lyngen Fjord and Manndalen, to neutral Sweden in the spring of 1943. The film, based on historical events, was adapted from the book Jan Baalsrud and Those Who Saved Him (2001) by Tore Haug and Astrid Karlsen Scott.[3]

Unlike the book, The 12th Man emphasizes the efforts of those who helped Baalsrud escape, which is in line with Baalsrud's own statements about the local population's courage. The plot also details the pursuit of Baalsrud from the Sicherheitsdienst (SD) leadership's perspective, depicting the escape as a cat-and-mouse game between SturmbannführerKurt Stage and Baalsrud.

Plot[edit]

The 12th Man tells the dramatic story of Jan Baalsrud's escape from the Nazis during the Second World War.

In Shetland, 12 Norwegian resistance fighters board a fishing boat with eight tons of TNT and cross the North Sea as part of Operation Martin with a plan to sabotage German military facilities. The mission gets into trouble soon after reaching Norway, where their local contact is long dead and their identity is compromised by a German sympathiser, who informs the Germans about their arrival.

A German warship locates the fishing boat and opens fire. The resistance fighters ignite the TNT and jump into the water near the fjord. Eleven of the fighters are rounded up by the Germans on the beach. One is shot on the spot and ten are captured. Two die from torture while being interrogated, the other captive fighters are executed on Tromsøya, after the German officers interrogate and torture them about their mission.

The 12th resistance fighter, Jan Baalsrud, manages to escape by hiding and swimming across the fjord, in sub-zero temperatures. He receives assistance from locals who risk their lives to help. He undergoes severe physical trials of endurance and hardship. Baalsrud is helped to escape from Rebbenesøya to Sweden, via Lyngenhalvøya and Manndalen.[4]

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

In March 2004, producer Veslemøy Ruud Zwart secured the film rights to the book Jan Baalsrud and Those Who Saved Him.[5] Filming began by April 2016.[6] The book and its film adaptation have the same protagonist as Arne Skouen's Oscar-nominated film Nine Lives (1957), in which Baalsrud's courage and stamina were also emphasized. Jan Baalsrud's story was also told in We Die Alone by David Howarth.

According to German documents, the Nazis believed that the resistance group had perished in a blast. There are no reports indicating that the Germans knew to hunt for Baalsrud, who claims that he killed two German soldiers in the fight.[7]

Thomas Gullestad went on a diet to play the lead role.[8]

Reception[edit]

On review aggregatorRotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 86%, based on 21 reviews with an average rating of 6.52/10.[9]Metacritic gives the film a weighted average score of 70 out of 100, based on ten critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[10]

Aftenposten observes that the film emphasizes Baalsrud's helpers and the struggle of the Resistance in a completely different way than in Arne Skouen's film Nine Lives (1957); The 12th Man offers a nuance to the Baalsrud legend.[11]

Morten Ståle Nilsen, in Verdens Gang, refers to The 12th Man as "a solid, but predictable film". While complimenting the amazing scenery of Norway, VS said its magnificent nature couldn't save the film from being monotonous, overlong, and too focused on suffering.[12]

Nicolai Berg Hansson, from Film Magasinet, said the film was successful as an action movie, but if one is to criticize it for something, "it may feel a bit… hollow. It might have said much more about human psychology, survival instinct and trauma".[13]

Sigurd Vik, from P3's Film Police, believed the film was playing with clichés, especially in the depiction of the SS officer Kurt Stage. The review complimented director Zwart's influence of Nils Gaup, "when combining magnificent coastal and mountain scenery, and the insolence of the wilderness with dense and tough action sequences". The review also said that turning a serious Norwegian Resistance struggle into an action film works well.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^Dennis Harvey (2018-05-02). "Film Review: 'The 12th Man'". Variety.
  2. ^"Movies: The 12th Man". Box Office Mojo.
  3. ^Haug, Tore; Astrid Karlsen Scott (2001). Jan Baalsrud and Those Who Saved Him. ISBN .
  4. ^"Incredibly, the jaw-dropping scenes in this vivid WWII survivalist film are true". Times of Israel. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  5. ^Fredriksen, Rune (1 March 2006). "Zwart vil lage 'Ni Liv' på nytt" [Zwart will create 'Nine Lives' again]. NRK. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  6. ^Selås, Jon (20 April 2016). "Magert helvete for Thomas "Finger'n" Gullestad under innspilling av "Den 12. mann"" [Magert Hell for Thomas "Finger'n" Gold City while recording "The 12th Man"]. Verdens Gang. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  7. ^Kvam, Ragnar Jr. (2 January 2018). "Tyskerne jaktet ikke på Jan Baalsrud" [The Germans did not hunt Jan Baalsrud]. Aftenposten. Retrieved 3 January 2018.
  8. ^Alnes, Espen (2016-02-22). "Han skal spele Jan Baalsrud". NRK (in Norwegian Nynorsk). Retrieved 2018-12-28.
  9. ^"The 12th Man (2018)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  10. ^"The 12th Man Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 20 May 2020.
  11. ^Lismoen, Kjetil (13 December 2017). ""Den 12. mann": En nyansering av Baalsrud-legenden" [The 12th Man – A Gradation of Baalsrud legend]. Aftenposten (in Norwegian). Retrieved 30 December 2017.
  12. ^Nilsen, Morten Ståle (13 December 2017). "Filmanmeldelse "Den 12. mann": Kald krig" [The 12th Man: Cold War]. Verdens Gang (in Norwegian). Retrieved 30 December 2017.
  13. ^Hansson, Nicolai Berg (14 December 2017). "Den 12. mann" [The 12th Man]. Film Magasinet (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 31 December 2017. Retrieved 30 December 2017.
  14. ^Vik, Sigurd (13 December 2017). "Den 12. mann" [The 12th Man]. Filmpolitet (in Norwegian). NRK P3. Retrieved 30 December 2017.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_12th_Man_(film)
Nazi Princesses - The Fates of Top Nazis' Wives \u0026 Mistresses

Operation Martin


Operation Martin (Red) was an Alliedclandestine operation of the Second World War to destroy a German airfield control tower at Bardufoss and organise secret military resistance groups in Tromsø in German-occupied Norway in 1943.

The operation consisted of twelve Norwegian nationals falling under the Company Linge group, who had been trained by the British in Scotland and returned to Norway in March 1943.

Mission[edit]

Team members[edit]

  • Løytnant Sigurd Eskeland
  • FenrikJan Baalsrud
  • Fenrik Per Blindheim
  • Kaptein Sverre Odd Kverhellen
  • Erik Reichelt
  • Harald Peter Ratvik
  • Bjørn Normann Bolstad
  • Gabriel Salvesen
  • Magnus Johan Kvalvik
  • Frithjof M. Haugland
  • Sjur Ludvigsen Trovaag
  • Alfred A. Vik
  • Cyrill J. Banzon

Failure[edit]

This operation was compromised when the Norwegian operatives, seeking a trusted local resistance contact, accidentally met an unaligned civilian shopkeeper with the same name as their contact, who reported them to the Germans.

The escape failed when the group's vessel MK Bratholm I was detected and attacked by the German frigateRäumboot R56. To escape, MK Bratholm I was scuttled by its Norwegian crew by detonating 8 t (7.9 long tons) explosives with a time delay fuse. The crew fled in a small boat, which was promptly sunk by the Germans. Eleven Norwegian soldiers from the Company Linge died; one was shot at the site, ten were captured, interrogated, and tortured by the Gestapo and then executed in Tromsø. Jan Baalsrud managed to escape from Rebbenesøya to neutral Sweden; his three-month escape was made through Lyngen and Manndalen with the help of local villagers, during which he amputated nine toes to avoid the spread of gangrene.

Executions[edit]

The executions of the prisoners in Tromsø were investigated after the war under the case of Toftefjordsaken.

The Gestapo officers who tortured and executed eight of the MK "Bratholm 1" crew were ordered in the late summer of 1945 to dig up the bodies from the mass grave at Grønnåsen Skytebane, first with spades, then by hand, so as to not damage the bodies. They also had to wash the bodies before placing them in coffins.

The prosecution after the war became problematic as the main target, Kurt Stage, was not in Norwegian custody. Stage was executed in 1947 in Slovenia for war crimes there; no criminal proceedings were brought against the four others who were charged in the case.[1]

In popular culture[edit]

Two films have been made based on Operation Martin: the 1957 Ni Liv (Nine Lives) and the 2017 Den 12. Mann (The 12th Man). The latter, directed by the Norwegian director Harald Zwart, stars Thomas Gullestad as Jan Baalsrud and Jonathan Rhys Meyers as Kurt Stage.[2]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 69°03′43″N18°30′17″E / 69.0619°N 18.5048°E / 69.0619; 18.5048

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Martin

Wiki kurt stage

Kurt Stage (born June 10, 1900 , † August 19, 1947 in Ljubljana ) was a German police officer at the time of National Socialism .

Live and act

Stage attended the Realgymnasium in Potsdam , which he left with the primary school leaving certificate . He then completed a commercial apprenticeship in Berlin . He later became unemployed. At the beginning of 1926 he got a job as a judicial clerk, first at the district court in Potsdam , then in Schöneberg, where he stayed until the mid-1930s.

According to his own statements, he joined the NSDAP in 1922 . However, his membership card shows the entry date October 23, 1925 and the membership number 27,171.

Stage had been working for the SS security service since 1932 . In 1935 he came to the Gestapo from the local court in Schöneberg . After training as a detective commissioner, he worked in the Gestapo department “Affairs of the NSDAP and its branches” under Josef Meisinger . Later he took over the management of the same department - Department IV C 4 (Affairs of the party and its branches) - in Office IV (Gestapo) of the newly established Reich Security Main Office . He was later assigned to foreign missions: first from autumn 1942 to March or May 1944 as KdS with the rank of Sturmbannführer in Tromsø in Norway [1] then as KdS in Maribor(Marburg an der Drau) in Yugoslavia .

After the war, Stage was interned by the Allies and handed over to the Yugoslav government. On June 10, 1947, he was sentenced to death by a court martial in Celje and executed in August 1947 .

Movie

literature

  • Michael Wildt: Generation of the Unconditional. The leadership corps of the Reich Security Main Office , 2002.

Individual evidence

  1. ^ Robert Bohn: Reichskommissariat Norway , 2000, p. 89.
Sours: https://second.wiki/wiki/kurt_stage
Kurt Meyer's Diary on Battle of Caen 1944 [HD Colour]

SS-Sturmbannführer


Kurt Stage

Geboren: 6.1.1900 in Potsdam
Hingerichtet: 19.8.1947 in Lubljana (Laibach)
According to DRK MIA as a POW to English Forces.

SS-Nr: 36221
NSDAP-Nr: 21171

SS-Stubaf: 30.1.37
SS-Hstuf - 20.4.35
SS-Ostuf: 1.9.32
SS-Ustuf: 13.10.31

Known units
KdS / SD u SS-Pol.Fhr in Marburg : 1944-1945
KdS / SD u SS-Pol.Fhr in Tromsö (Norway) 1942-1944
RSHA IV C4 : 1941 - (Chef)
RSHA IV 1a : 1935 - 1941

Known awards
Goldene Parteiabz.
Totenkopfring d. RFSS
Ehrendegen d. SS
NSDAP DAZ
SS-DAZ

Kurt Stage joined the NSDAP as early as in 1925, shortly afterwards even to the SA. Was in 1930 appointed to form and raise the SS-Sturm Potsdam,which he did. In 1931 he was appointed to Pressereferent for RFSS. In 1934 he became he member of the SD (Sicherheitsdienst) and in 1935 he became part of Gestapo Department IV 1a.

Kurt Stage was in 1941 sent to Norway, and  remained his task to search for partisans  and anti german groups. After Norway he was sent to Marburg (Slowenia) with the same task as in Norway. In this office he would remain until the end of the war. Stage fleed to Austria and hid. He was later taken and placed in a POW camp Tamsweg. In wich he would be arrested on June 1 1945 by British Forces.
Newspaper announcing Stages sentence

Stage was also a witness in the Nürnberg process and was later placed in the UK POW camp for SS personell at Neuengamme. From this camp was he turned over to the Yugoslawia Forces in october 1946. They held a trial against Stage and was later sentenced to death and it was carried out in August 1947.

Obviusly didn´t Kurt Stages family know his fate and reported him as MIA to the DRK. In the ad is he listed as SS-Sturmmann (Private). When they did that he had been dead for years. Kurt Stage is not the only one who had this fate. Many others had been taken by Allied and Russian forces and without letting the familys know their relatives fate. More will come about those examples.

//Georg
'
Sources: Dienstalterliste, SS-Verordnungsblatt, AHF, Wikipidea, DRK
Sours: http://wennallebruderschweigen.blogspot.com/2019/07/ss-sturmbannfuhrer-kurt-stage-spater.html

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Incredibly, the jaw-dropping scenes in this vivid WWII survivalist film are true

NEW YORK — Many arts journals and news outlets “grade” movies with a star system. Five stars to an Oscar winner, one star to another dull superhero movie that forgets to cast Gal Gadot or Paul Rudd.

Movies like “The 12th Man” shouldn’t get stars — they should get “oy”s. It’s two brutal hours of watching a man suffer, in a parade of “oy”s that might even culminate in that Jewish brass ring: “You shouldn’t know from it.” If director Harald Zwart’s intention was to make everyone watching this film feel grossed-out, paranoid and miserable, well, congratulations, it’s a job well done.

“The 12th Man” tells the story of Jan Sigurd Baalsrud, whom I never heard of — but if I were Norwegian I’d probably stand up and take off my hat just reciting his name.

He was a map-maker, world traveler and tinkerer who, during World War II, fled Nazi-occupied Norway and eventually found his way to the United Kingdom, training with the resistance. He ended up participating in something called Operation Martin Red, a mission of sabotage and establishing communications that went south as soon as it started.

Baalsrud’s small group’s fishing boat was attacked, one man was killed, 10 others were captured, but Baalsrud — the 12th man of the title — escaped.

He caught a bullet in his foot and swam across a fjord of sub-freezing temperatures. Salt water can stay liquid without turning to ice, we quickly learn. Who knew?

And this is just the beginning of his woes. By the time the movie ends he’ll survive an avalanche, fever hallucinations, grotesque self-surgery, starvation, spinning into oblivion off a speeding sled, numerous occasions of shutting his eyes and hoping the gun-toting SS officer won’t hear him breathing while hiding just inches away, and so much more. Our guy hides for 10 days under a rock in the blinding cold with nothing but a sleeping bag! Oy gevalt, who needs to see such a movie??!

Well, the fact is that this history film/horror movie is extremely engaging, lead actor Thomas Gullestad is quite effective as the steely-eyed survivor, and one never needs an excuse for a refresher in just how horrible the Nazis were, lest we ever think history can’t repeat itself.

The man hunting Baalsrud was Kurt Stage (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), an SS field commander stuck out in the frozen hinterlands and terrified of being anything but a perfect soldier for the top Berlin brass. His obsession with finding the 12th Man seems fanatical — no ordinary man could survive! — but as this movie proves, Baalsrud is no ordinary man. The film doesn’t so much applaud Stage for his tenacity (indeed, they show him ordering the brutal torture of his other prisoners) but celebrates how Baalsrud became a folk hero.

It took 63 days for Baalsrud to find his way across the border to neutral Sweden. An opening title card says that “the most incredible events in this story are the ones that actually took place.” So it isn’t just the good luck of a pin falling off Stage’s lapel as he does a second sweep of a farmhouse, it also means there lived once a righteous reindeer who risked it all to protect Norway from fascism. (I’m calling it. The best freedom-fighting reindeer in all of cinema can be found right here in “The 12th Man.”)

Jonathan Rhys Meyers as SS officer Kurt Stage in ‘The 12th Man.’ (YouTube)

It’s a little vague what Baalsrud’s report back to the British actually accomplished, but his against-all-odds endurance could not have been more valuable. His survival wasn’t due solely to his iron will against physical pain. It was the bravery and mindfulness of a chain of farmers, boatsmen and plain old citizens who risked their necks to help him.

(They weren’t all trained military geniuses; one sequence shows what happens when someone mishears the name of a location for another that sounds similar. It’s like the “Petah Tikva/Beit Hatikva” gag from “The Band’s Visit” only with more blood and snow!)

Baalsrud is a legend in Norway (and some try – and usually fail – to repeat his hike) and hopefully this movie will spread his name internationally.

Zwart, known more for frothier Hollywood fare like “Agent Cody Banks,” “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones” and the remake of “The Karate Kid” (that I completely forgot about until looking it up right now) clearly made this as a passion project for the land in which he was raised.

If it weren’t for the cries of a man with a gangrenous foot, the sweeping snowcapped vistas and crystalline fjords would make this a lovely picture. It’s still definitely worth watching, though maybe without the popcorn.

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