Multi effects processor rack

Multi effects processor rack DEFAULT

Please recommend me a modern multi-effects rack


I´m in need of a new rack multi-effects processor for touring. Besides Fractal Axe-fx, what modern option would you recommend? I like the tones on the intellifex and pcm

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jimbridgman's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guitarrista➡️

I´m in need of a new rack multi-effects processor for touring. Besides Fractal Axe-fx, what modern option would you recommend? I like the tones on the intellifex and pcm

What exactly are you looking for in an Effects processor?

You mention an AXE-FX, but that is not really a Multi Effects processor. It is a Guitar processor with amp emulation or AMP Sims as they are called these days.

A Lexicon PCM70 is also not a true multi effects processor either. I own one and it is an amazing reverb unit, I use mine specifically for snare drum reverb.

If you want something that has amp sims and effects, you might look at the Kemper. I have two of them and love them in the studio. Also the Axe-FX II is amazing as well. It just depends on what you want it to do and how you want it to sound and feel when you play through it.

If you just want multi effects what about an Eventide you can get them for about 1K USD.

Also how and what to you plan to connect it into when you tour? For instance will it go into your amps fx loop, or from a pedal board into a preamp then into several rack units then into an amp and speaker cab?

I have a full on rack unit with a few preamps several delay units and a couple verb units and a chorus unit, but got rid of all of my "multi effects" all in one units back in the early 90s, and went with several specific use units instead.

Jim


Last edited by jimbridgman; 1st August at PM..

Something like an eventide Orville would cover a lot of bases.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimbridgman➡️

What exactly are you looking for in an Effects processor?

You mention an AXE-FX, but that is not really a Multi Effects processor. It is a Guitar processor with amp emulation or AMP Sims as they are called these days.

A Lexicon PCM70 is also not a true multi effects processor either. I own one and it is an amazing reverb unit, I use mine specifically for snare drum reverb.

If you want something that has amp sims and effects, you might look at the Kemper. I have two of them and love them in the studio. Also the Axe-FX II is amazing as well. It just depends on what you want it to do and how you want it to sound and feel when you play through it.

If you just want multi effects what about an Eventide you can get them for about 1K USD.

Also how and what to you plan to connect it into when you tour? For instance will it go into your amps fx loop, or from a pedal board into a preamp then into several rack units then into an amp and speaker cab?

I have a full on rack unit with a few preamps several delay units and a couple verb units and a chorus unit, but got rid of all of my "multi effects" all in one units back in the early 90s, and went with several specific use units instead.

Jim

Thanks! You mean the Eventide Eclipse? I need to use a 2U gator rack with a Triaxis and a Multi-effects unit i already use a JMP-1 and an Intellifex, but i´d like something better and more flexible i was thinking it could be the
Triaxis + some good efx unit i could just buy an Axe-Fx, but i don´t want to risk that much cash touring, because i have to play in some ****ty places

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jimbridgman's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guitarrista➡️

Thanks! You mean the Eventide Eclipse? I need to use a 2U gator rack with a Triaxis and a Multi-effects unit i already use a JMP-1 and an Intellifex, but i´d like something better and more flexible i was thinking it could be the
Triaxis + some good efx unit i could just buy an Axe-Fx, but i don´t want to risk that much cash touring, because i have to play in some ****ty places

Ok got it.

I would not get an AXE-FX just for an effect unit, it would be a big waste of money.

No I would not get an Eclipse, especially if you are worried about having something nice and expensive in crappy places. I would say to try and find an Eventide H of some kind. They are killer and are built like a tank, and sound great and used they are like USD.

I would think about a TC Electronic G-Major 2.

I use a TC Electronics D-two in my racks for delays and they sound great, both in the studio and for live playing and gigging. I would go for the G-Major 2 for a multi-effect unit.




Jim

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimbridgman➡️

Ok got it.

I would not get an AXE-FX just for an effect unit, it would be a big waste of money.

No I would not get an Eclipse, especially if you are worried about having something nice and expensive in crappy places. I would say to try and find an Eventide H of some kind. They are killer and are built like a tank, and sound great and used they are like USD.

I would think about a TC Electronic G-Major 2.

I use a TC Electronics D-two in my racks for delays and they sound great, both in the studio and for live playing and gigging. I would go for the G-Major 2 for a multi-effect unit.




Jim

Isn´t the Eventide H a Harmonizer?

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jimbridgman's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guitarrista➡️

Isn´t the Eventide H a Harmonizer?

Sorry that was typo H, and not it is not JUST a harmonizer, it is much more.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimbridgman➡️

Sorry that was typo H, and not it is not JUST a harmonizer, it is much more.

The H would be nice for you. If you like the pcm70 you will find much more nice stuff and maybe inspiration in this piece of gear. The H is one of my favorite gear in my studio! It has manny nice fx - from reverbs, delays to phasers, pitch-shifters or reversers. Try it! You will like it!

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My Studio

🎧 5 years

I wouldn't take a H on tour, they are getting a bit temperamental in their old age and don't really like to be moved around.
I'd look at an Eclipse, they were partly designed to be a Harmonizer for live use, and cover pretty much any effect you can think of. (Top quality too!)
Secondhand ones can often be found under $

Gear Nut

Maybe consider stepping outside the rack. Have you looked at the Eventide H9? Its super portable and you can buy the effects you want a la carte and then control the parameters with a phone or tablet. Check it out.

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Check out a Lex PCM . Modulation delays and reverbs. You can dig into it deeply or just tweak the major parameters.

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Squawk's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

For guitar? Just for fx? The Fractal axe-fx is a fantastic unit for effects. Lots of people use it just for the effects only, and use it for touring. Far deeper than the kemper on the effects side of things (I have both here). Also easy to build patches with the software interface. They also have a floor unit now that I believe is fx only. Eventide Eclipse might be another one for you to check out.

TC Electronics -- way easy to use ~!! True stereo // Dual Mono -- We have 3 running all day in the studio

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guitarrista➡️

I´m in need of a new rack multi-effects processor for touring. Besides Fractal Axe-fx, what modern option would you recommend? I like the tones on the intellifex and pcm

The TC Electronics Fireworx is nice. Same with Older Eventide DSP and H series processors.
Sours: https://gearspace.com/board/

TC Electronic G-Force Rack Mount Guitar Multi Effects Processor with 8 Simultaneous Effects and Memory Card Slot

From the Manufacturer

The legendary G-Force gives you a variety of great sound effects in an easy to program and fun to operate single rack unit. State-of-the-art DSP technology and 24 bit resolution gives you massive memory, high-speed processing and the best sound quality available.

Flexible routing and control possibilities combined with 8 full-blown effects, each with sound quality surpassing stand alone units, generate sounds unlike any you have heard or even dreamt of before. With the G-Force, digital multiple effects processing has finally come of age enabling you to have high quality sounds without sacrificing the integrity of your original tone!

The G-Force is the most versatile Guitar effects processor on the market. Guitar players are a demanding group of musicians as they per tradition have very individual needs and ideas on how a chain of effects should be built, set up and controlled.

The G-Force is unprecedented in meeting these demands due to its flexible routing and versatility when it comes to external control. The know-how of TC Electronic – renowned in top-end audio hardware and effects-processing markets - is all to your disposal and benefit, guaranteeing outstanding performance.

Display & Tuner
The display consists of two sections. One for detailed Preset information and editing. The other section clearly displays Preset Number or Tuner information with large digits that are easy to see even on distance e.g. on a stage.

PCMCIA
With a standard PCMCIA card (not supplied) you have perfect and easy backup of your favorite presets. You can store up to 10 banks of presets on a 1Mb card.

Tap Tempo
All tempo-related effects can be set to respond to a tapped tempo. Either from the G-Force front panel or from a MIDI pedal or even a momentary switch connected to the Pedal Input on the G-Force rear panel. This allows the Tempo of e.g. the Delay to be perfectly matched to the song you are currently playing.

Effect Block Keys
The 9 Effect Block keys serve for various purposes and make the navigation in the G-Force a breeze. From the Recall page effect blocks can be switched on/off with a single click. In the Effects menu each block is accessed fast with a double click on one of the block keys. This means easy editing and preset configuration. No endless menus to scroll trough to achieve basic functions.

Fast Navigation
Navigating in menus is natural and logical. With two cursor keys for vertical navigation, a dedicated Parameter Select wheel and a dedicated wheel for changing Parameter values, it simply doesn’t get any better.


Building your Preset
- routing your effectboard:


The G-Force is packed with presets covering a wide range of styles from gentle to extreme processing. Additional xxx presets are available via the G-Card created by some of the worlds most esteemed guitarists.

Though the preprogrammed presets cover most any style, you will probably like to dive in and program or adjust presets yourself. The G-Force itself holds User preset locations. With a 1Mb PCMCIA card, up to 10 banks of presets can be stored additionally - Either for direct access or for simple backup.


Setting up effect-algorithm blocks in the G-Force Routing matrix is extremely easy. The idea is pretty much like building a brand new pedal-board for each preset without touching a single chord or soldering a single plug. Use the PARAMETER WHEEL to select the position where you wish to insert an effect and select which block to insert using the VALUE wheel. Route in serial or parallel, three blocks in parallel or more and the rest in serial – it’s up to you.

Then go to your Edit menu using the ARROW keys, double-click on the effect block your wish to setup first and you are on your way.


Setting up effect-algorithm blocks in the G-Force Routing matrix is extremely easy. The idea is pretty much like building a brand new pedal-board for each preset without touching a single chord or soldering a single plug. Use the PARAMETER WHEEL to select the position where you wish to insert an effect and select which block to insert using the VALUE wheel. Route in serial or parallel, three blocks in parallel or more and the rest in serial – it’s up to you.Then go to your Edit menu using the ARROW keys, double-click on the effect block your wish to setup first and you are on your way.
 


Partial Recall
Of course you can start building each block from scratch every time, but wouldn’t it be nice if you could just extract your favorite effect blocks from various presets and mix them in one single preset without having to “dial in” all the values? You can – using the Partial Recall function. Via the Recall display you can simply chose to recall only one effect block and load this block into your current preset.


Guitarists are the most demanding group of practicing musicians when it comes to controlling their sound and effects. The G-Force is nothing less than unique; not only can you control virtually any parameter via a MIDI board and expression pedals but it is also EASY to set up.

There tend to be two main directions in controlling Guitar sound via any pedal board.
A - Full preset change for radical changes
B – “Stomp box” type where only single effects are turned on and off.
With the G-Force you don’t have to decide which is for you. With any MIDI board you can utilize the advantages of both the “Preset change” and “Stomp Box” idea described above.

Setting up
Instead of having to figure out which MIDI messages your board actually sends out and dialing these values into the G-Force – simply let the G-Force detect received messages in the “learn” mode.

Example
Your MIDI board has 10 switches and one Expression pedal attached. 5 switches on the board sends program changes and 5 send control changes. On the five switches sending program changes you setup your radical sound changes e.g. 1 for clean, 1 for Chrunch and 1 for Overdrive. The last two you might use for special sounds. Each of these sounds you program with basic effects. The five switches sending Cc Messages can be used as on/ off switches for e.g. Delay, Chorus, Reverb, Compressor, and the last maybe for Tap Tempo. It is really up to you.

Expression Pedals
Use up to eight connected Expression pedals to change parameter values. Which parameter the expression pedal controls, is set at preset level. This means that even with a single expression pedal connected you can vary its function from preset to preset. In one preset it could act as Volume control, in another as a Whammy – or what about floating control of Reverb level, the Depth of a Chorus or…??? The options are endless – and you CAN really express yourself!


The MODIFIER menu - is the connecting link between external controllers and the G-Force effects and much more. Let us just throw a few ideas at you:

  • Where you assign Expression pedals to specific parameters
  • Setup the Pitch of the notes you play to control the amount of effect to be added to your sound depending on the pitch of the note you play! Imagine playing with completely dry sound at the low strings, - then as you move towards higher pitched notes the G-Force automatically detects that a higher pitch is played and the reverb output level is increased
  • Let the dynamics of your playing control any parameter. You probably know this from the classic Touch Wah effect – or maybe in a Dynamic Delay where the Delay output is dampened during played phrases and increased as you “breathe” in between phases
  • Adding also ADSR – Attack Decay Sustain Release and LFO’s, you can’t come to any other conclusion than with the-G Force – anything is possible

TC Electronic is well known for its experience in high quality effects processing and technology. The G-Force fully benefits from this experience.

The G-Force holds a Simple and an Advanced Reverb mode. In Simple mode you can pre-select room types and choose from: Room, Club, Hall, Church, Cathedral, Grand Hall, Fast Decay, Slow Decay, Plate and Spring. All of these can of course be twisted to your liking using all standard reverb parameters such as: Decay, PreDelay and Color.

With the Advanced mode selected you have less predefined types to chose from but more detailed control via various parameters thus giving you extended flexibility when it comes to designing your own rooms.


Introduction
The Delay block have five different sub-algorithms: Stereo, Dual, Dual Two-tap, One-tap and Quad-tap.

Stereo – Which treats the Left and Right Input signals independently. This mode is interesting only when the G- Force is fed with a stereo Input.

Dual – Offer two delay lines meaning that you can have two separate delay times on the same Input signal. The two delay lines each have a completely separate set of parameters. Furthermore the two Delay lines can be fed to each other's Input and act similar to two Delay units in serial.

Dual Two Tap – are two independent Delay lines which each has two fully controllable individual Delay taps.

One Tap – is a simple to use straight Delay with a single Delay line. This is the type that is closest to a regular stomp-box type.

Quad Tap – offers one Delay line with four individual Taps, each with its own set of parameters.

Smooth preset change using Delay spillover:
When using long Delay times, Effects spillover can be used to achieve smooth preset changes. By using the same Delay sub-algorithm in the presets you are switching between, and setting Mute mode to “Fx In” and bypassing the current block, the long Delay from e.g. a solo sound can gently fade even after you have switched to a dry clean sound with no Delay.

Dynamic Delay as known from the TC
This feature that dampens the Output of the Delay while you play a phrase and increases the Delay Output level in between phrases can also be setup in the G-Force. It is done via the Mod Matrix using an Envelope on the Delay Output. The fastest way to set this up is using one of the factory presets with Dynamic Delay. Detailed explanation can be found in the manual.


Chorus
The G-Force offers two modes of both Chorus and Flanger effects. The Classic and the Advanced. While Classic holds just the basic parameters the Advanced includes:
  • Delay control
  • Phase Reverse
  • LFO curve selection (Sine or Square)
  • LFO Phase 0, 90 and degrees.
  • Golden Ratio which in “on” position ensures a perfect balance between Speed and Depth for the original smooth Chorus effect. For wilder less traditional Chorus sound, the Golden Ratio should be set to “off

Flanger
Similar build and parameters as the Chorus described above but with additional Feedback and Crossfeed parameters.

The G-Force Pitch section is a chapter of its own. Offering both Intelligent Two Voice, Fixed 1 and Fixed 2 voices, Dual Detune and 2 voices 2 octaves; the most wanted pitch effects are nailed - and more too.Once you have worked with the different Pitch algorithms for just a few minutes you will be amazed with the tracking speed and precision.

Intelligent Two Voice
This algorithm is used to generate additional one or two voices in the key and after any scale of your choice. Pick a scale from:

  • Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian – Diminished, Whole Tone, Dom. Seven, Diminished Whole Tone, Melodic minor, Harmonic minor, Major or minor Pentatonic, Blues or design your own Custom Scale.
  • Then select at which interval your voices should be added - e.g. a third above and a fifth below.
    Play – and you have instant harmonies.
Detune and Delay on each voice can be set to give a more natural sounding harmony.

Fixed 1 Voice and Fixed 2
This is typically used to create e.g. an Octaver effect or to add a static fifth or ?? – Control the generated Pitch with an External Expression pedal and you have a true Whammy function.

Dual Detune
The Dual Detune effect is typically used for a static Chorus-like function. You can simply add one or two voices slightly out of tune with the played tone.

In the Panner block you can create level changing effects such as Tremolo. A Tremolo basically changes the level of the signal according to certain specified patterns.

Simple Tremolo
The most common type of Tremolo. Speed, Depth and Mix level can be controlled.

Advanced Tremolo
The advanced mode holds the same basic parameters and LFO control in addition. With the LFO control you can select between Square and Sine Curve patterns and the Phase of these patters can be set to 0, 90 or degrees. The Sine Curve type is the most commonly used, but you will enjoy the Square mode if you are aiming at rhythmic abrupt patterns.

Simple
The Simple Panner pans the signal from Left to Right in accordance with the set Speed.

“Surround” Panner
Though we are not talking about a true six channel system, a surround feel can be created using the added Center and Width parameters in the Surround Panner mode.


Parametric EQ
3 band parametric EQ with additional low and high shelve parameters. Simply a full-blown EQ that gently applied can help you fine tune you gear or with radical settings can dramatically change the entire sound with a flick of a switch. As an example on the latter - check out the “Broken Speaker” preset.

Resonance filer
Resonance filters are basically high and low cut filters that can be swept up and down through the frequency range. When the Resonance (Q-factor) parameter is increased, the filter’s peak at the cutoff frequency gets very narrow and very steep. That is at the very core of the characteristic sound of Resonance filters.

Wah-Wah
The Wah-Wah effect in the G-Force is simply a static frequency boost. It combines well with an Envelope Filter (Modifier section) giving a funky Touch Wah effect or with an Expression Pedal as external modifier, which gives the regular pedal-controlled Wah-pedal effect.

Formant
The Formant filters are somewhat special. They can create an entirely new sound for you. Imagine a pedal that does not say WAH WAH, but instead goes OOWEE-OOWEE. Formants are also known as the vowels of human speech. The basic idea is that you set three coordinates, Start, Thru and End in a frequency area, and then move your sound up and down the curve you created with the coordinates. – Try Out the presets using Formant Filters to get the idea.


Compressor
The G Force Compressor holds both a Simple and Advanced Compressor mode. Where the Simple mode has only the basic Threshold and Ratio, the Advanced mode also includes a soft/hard knee mode and Release rate for even more control.

Gate
Very often the signal chain from guitar to Wah into a preamp creates more hiss and noise than can be handled without a well-placed effective Noise Gate. Once adjusted to your individual presets the G-Force Noise Gate will be a tool you wouldn’t want to be without.

Drive
The Drive section is an excellent tool for coloring your effects. E.g. place a Drive block after the Delay section and you can add drive to the Delays leaving the direct signal unaffected.Though some use the G-Force drive block as a guitar preamp it is not designed specifically for this purpose and it is not to be considered as a full mature Guitar preamp.

Connectors

1/4" phone jack, unbalanced

Impedance

1 MOhm

Max. Input Level

+22 dBu

Sensitivity

@ 16 dB headroom: dBu to +6 dBu

A to D Conversion

24 bit (1 bit, times oversampling)

Dynamic Range

> dB

THD

% @ 1 kHz, 6 dB below full scale at 16 dBu max. full scale level

Frequency Response

+0/ dB (20 Hz - 20 kHz)

Crosstalk

< dB (20 Hz - 20 kHz)

Connectors

1/4" phone jack, balanced

Impedance

Ohm (active transformer)

Max. Output Level

+22dBu

Full Scale Output Range

dB to 22 dB

D to A Conversion

24 bit (1 bit, times oversampling)

Dynamic Range

> dB

THD

% @ 1 kHz
6 dB below full scale at 16 dBu max. full scale level

Frequency Response

+0/ dB (20 Hz - 20 kHz)

Crosstalk

< dB (20 Hz - 20 kHz)

MIDI

In/Out/Thru: 5 Pin DIN

External control

1/4" phone jack

Finish

Anodized aluminum face, Plated and painted steel chassis

Dimensions

19"x " x " ( x 44 x mm)

Weight

lb. ( kg)

Mains Voltage

to VAC, 50 to 60 Hz (auto-select)

Backup Battery Life

>10 years

Parts and labor

1 year

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/TC-Electronic-G-Force-Processor-Simultaneous/dp/BEA
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9 rack effect bargains guitarists need to check out

Once all the rage, rack equipment has largely gone out of fashion for casual musicians and smaller bands, with the only notable exceptions being popular rack-mounted amp modellers such as the Axe-Fx and Kemper units.  

As a result, particularly on the used market it's possible for the average player to pick up previously high-end gear for use live, or more likely, in a home studio.

So here's a rundown of several units that are worth some attention, and which might trigger some new creative revelation - all at potentially bargain basement prices.

1. Lexicon MPX1

With few celebrity endorsements and without being the flagship of its generation, the relatively recent MPX1 might seem like a strange recommendation, but bear with us.  

Boasting two reverb processors, with a dedicated processor for reverb on every patch, the result is a unit that can do complicated delays, choruses, pitch-shifting, panning and often some combination of the above in addition to the stellar core reverb. Extra functionality like random number seeding into patches allows for complex and subtle reverb and modulation effects.

Although there's perhaps no single 'wow' moment to be had, the unit is a studio workhorse, and works brilliantly for stereo delay and reverb on vocals, synths and guitar. By digging deeper through the menus, there are also very few wacky delay-based effects that can't be conjured into existence.

2. Alesis Midiverb II

There are a number of entries in the famous Midiverb series, but only one was used in anger by Kevin Shields on My Bloody Valentine's seminal LP Loveless. Although it has few editable parameters by comparison to other units, and little fuss on the front panel, the reverse reverb setting remains just as potent today as it was back in the heyday of dream-pop, and the bloom patch is also a lot of fun.

Other units in the series also crop up on groundbreaking shoegaze albums, with the Quadraverb+ being singled out by Verve guitarist Nick McCabe as one of his favourite pieces of gear used on their sprawling first album A Storm In Heaven; it can also be had for a song.

3. Line 6 POD

Surely we can't be serious? Well, like many things, perhaps the Line 6 Pod is due something of a reappraisal. Particularly in rack form, and especially for studio use, as a way of combining modelled guitars and a plethora of effects, the Pod is still a surprisingly strong contender, especially given how cheap it can be picked up.  

Want to try a wet-dry setup without running a second amp? The Pod's clean tones are likely to stack and blend more than adequately for cases such as this. Guitarist Jade Puget from arena punk-rockers AFI still runs one in his live rig for his clean sounds, so you'd be in good company.

4. Boss SX

Possibly the strangest of the lot, this unit's unique selling point was RSS technology, or 'Roland Sound Space'. If you're curious as to the details, then there's an appropriately dated Tomorrow's World segment on the subject on YouTube, complete with sound demos. The crux of it is this: RSS aims to create a wider-than-stereo sound using careful use of delay in parts of the stereo image.  

The effects are pretty startling in some cases, with multi-tap delays and filters taking you straight into bad trip territory. The reason this technology didn't catch on isn't clear; perhaps it has to do with mix and mastering engineers distrusting the more unsubtle wide stereo effects created. Either way, it has the potential to be the secret weapon of anybody working in the ambient, dream-pop or post-rock genres.

5. A/DA MP-1

A valve preamp with MIDI control, the ADA MP-1 could be found at the heart of many guitarists' rigs in the early ’90s, particularly in high-gain contexts.  

With users as diverse as Paul Gilbert, Nuno Bettencourt and Billy Corgan, it's no wonder that the unit has found itself becoming somewhat notorious. The only thing to be cautious of is that they can be unreliable due to age, or in need of repair.

Nevertheless, should you manage to pick up a well-maintained unit, its compressed, powerful distortion is undeniably great.

6. Roland SDE

Though these don't come up as frequently as some of the other units on this page, for an aficionado of early digital delay, the SDE is a must-have. Used by players like Eddie Van Halen for stereo delays, it's now also modelled faithfully in the Boss DD as a classic of ’80s digital delay.

Besides the sounds, perhaps the coolest feature of this unit is the Back To The Future-style front panel, which would surely bring a smile to the face of even the most jaded guitarist. Via this gloriously retro set of controls, you can set delay and modulation time while pretending you're messing with the time circuits in the DeLorean.

7. Yamaha SPX90

Another favourite of Kevin Shields, this is a somewhat generic digital multi-effect unit that shines when used for its delays, chorus tones and, you guessed it, its reverse reverb function. For chiming, Cure-like sounds, pair this with a Roland Jazz Chorus style amp for hours of fun.

8. Ibanez AD

One of the pricier units on this list, the AD sometimes comes up with cosmetic blemishes on the used market, and that's an ideal time to snap one up.

Armed with 3 bucket-brigade delay chips, it's a gorgeously warm analogue delay unit that can also be switched into a lush chorus mode. Crucially, it also looks like a Bond-villian superweapon control panel, which is ideally what you want from a rack setup.

9. Roland DC

The final entry on this list is cheating a bit. It's not actually a 1U rack unit, although it could be racked if needs be. This desktop analogue delay unit is perennially cheap, and if you're looking to run synths as well as guitars, could prove a decent home studio alternative to an analogue delay pedal.

Lexicon MPX1 vs Boss DD

The MPX1 is one of the newer units on the list, and its processing power has only recently been matched in foot-pedal format. On a good day, a used unit could be less than half of the price of the Boss DD delay new. So how does it stack up against the flagship Boss delay? Here are some key takeaways.

As you might expect, the DD is easier to use live; it's also easier to create new patches for and tweak things like delay time via tap. However, toggling tempo on the MPX1 is more precise via the front-panel, and especially if you're working with polyrhythms, feels easier to work with.

In terms of supporting the user, the Boss PC editor makes complex patches a breeze, but if you're patient, there are more possibilities with the MPX1 menu system. Not only that, but the standalone pitch algorithms, panning and random seeding are algorithms that aren’t accessible on the DD without excessive workarounds.

MPX-1 killer feature: dedicated reverb processor for every patch; the DD has some reverb-like delays, but not up to the standard of the MPX1, or indeed, the Boss RV

DD killer feature: A/B stereo delays. Being able to separate two delay patches out into the left and right channel for parallel delay effects is a pretty unique and powerful feature, not to mention intuitive to set up and work with.

Sours: https://www.musicradar.com/news/9-rack-effect-bargains-guitarists-need-to-check-out
Avid Eleven Rack Guitar Processor Review - motel6bendor.com

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Rack processor multi effects

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