Best vanguard tech etf

Best vanguard tech etf DEFAULT

Vanguard Technology ETF List

This is a list of all Vanguard Technology ETFs traded in the USA which are currently tagged by ETF Database. Please note that the list may not contain newly issued ETFs. If you’re looking for a more simplified way to browse and compare ETFs, you may want to visit our ETF Database Categories, which categorize every ETF in a single “best fit” category.

* Assets in thousands of U.S. Dollars.

This page includes historical return information for all Vanguard Technology ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database.

The table below includes fund flow data for all U.S. listed Vanguard Technology ETFs. Total fund flow is the capital inflow into an ETF minus the capital outflow from the ETF for a particular time period.

Fund Flows in millions of U.S. Dollars.

The following table includes expense data and other descriptive information for all Vanguard Technology ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database. In addition to expense ratio and issuer information, this table displays platforms that offer commission-free trading for certain ETFs.

Clicking on any of the links in the table below will provide additional descriptive and quantitative information on Vanguard Technology ETFs.

The following table includes ESG Scores and other descriptive information for all Vanguard Technology ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database. Easily browse and evaluate ETFs by visiting our Responsible Investing themes section and find ETFs that map to various environmental, social and governance themes.

This page includes historical dividend information for all Vanguard Technology listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database. Note that certain ETFs may not make dividend payments, and as such some of the information below may not be meaningful.

The table below includes basic holdings data for all U.S. listed Vanguard Technology ETFs that are currently tagged by ETF Database. The table below includes the number of holdings for each ETF and the percentage of assets that the top ten assets make up, if applicable. For more detailed holdings information for any ETF, click on the link in the right column.

The following table includes certain tax information for all Vanguard Technology ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database, including applicable short-term and long-term capital gains rates and the tax form on which gains or losses in each ETF will be reported.

This page contains certain technical information for all Vanguard Technology ETFs that are listed on U.S. exchanges and tracked by ETF Database. Note that the table below only includes limited technical indicators; click on the “View” link in the far right column for each ETF to see an expanded display of the product’s technicals.

This page provides links to various analyses for all Vanguard Technology ETFs that are listed on U.S. exchanges and tracked by ETF Database. The links in the table below will guide you to various analytical resources for the relevant ETF, including an X-ray of holdings, official fund fact sheet, or objective analyst report.

This page provides ETF Database Ratings for all Vanguard Technology ETFs that are listed on U.S. exchanges and tracked by ETF Database. The ETF Database Ratings are transparent, quant-based evaluations of ETFs relative to other products in the same ETF Database Category. As such, it should be noted that this page may include ETFs from multiple ETF Database Categories.

Sours: https://etfdb.com/themes/vanguard-technology-etfs/

The 5 Best Tech ETFs To Buy Tech Stocks in

The technology sector has had a particularly stellar run in recent years, considerably outperforming the market. Here we’ll review the best tech ETFs to buy tech stocks in

Disclosure:  Some of the links on this page are referral links. At no additional cost to you, if you choose to make a purchase or sign up for a service after clicking through those links, I may receive a small commission. This allows me to continue producing high-quality, ad-free content on this site and pays for the occasional cup of coffee. I have first-hand experience with every product or service I recommend, and I recommend them because I genuinely believe they are useful, not because of the commission I get if you decide to purchase through my links. Read more here.

In a hurry? Here’s the list:

  1. VGT – Vanguard Information Technology ETF
  2. XLK – Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund
  3. QQQ – Invesco QQQ Trust
  4. FDN – First Trust Dow Jones Internet Index Fund
  5. ARKK – ARK Innovation ETF

Introduction – Why Tech Stocks?

The tech sector is comprised of companies related to software, electronics, internet, computers, and other technological products and services. Think Apple, Microsoft, Adobe, Amazon, etc. Tech stocks are growth stocks, reinvesting profits into R&D and future projects to drive growth through innovation and invention. They usually pay low or no dividends.

The tech sector has expanded over the years as more internet- and software-focused companies have emerged. It is now by far the largest sector in the stock market, comprising over 25% of the total market by weight. Every corner of the modern economy touches technology in some way. Tech has been a major contributor to the growth of the total stock market in recent years, and specifically Big Tech (Amazon, Apple, Google, Microsoft, etc.). Because of this concentration of weight, constituents of the tech sector were reshuffled in late with a redefining of the GICS, e.g. Amazon went to Consumer Discretionary, Facebook went to Communication, etc.

Tech stocks have vastly outpaced the market over the last decade:

tech vs stock market

Many speculate that tech will continue its meteoric rise. Only time will tell.

Let’s look at the best tech ETFs.

The 5 Best Tech ETFs

Below are the 5 best tech ETFs to buy tech stocks:

VGT – Vanguard Information Technology ETF

The Vanguard Information Technology ETF (VGT) is one of the most popular tech ETFs on the market, with over $38 billion in assets. The fund seeks to track the MSCI US Investable Market Information Technology 25/50 Index, providing broad exposure to the tech sector in the United States. This ETF has over holdings and an expense ratio of %.

XLK – Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund

The Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLK) is another popular broad tech ETF. The fund was established in and seeks to track the Technology Select Sector Index. This ETF has 72 holdings. Whereas VGT above provides about 10% mid-cap growth exposure, XLK is exclusively large-caps. XLK has an expense ratio of %.

QQQ – Invesco QQQ Trust

The Invesco QQQ Trust is the most popular fund on this list, with over $ billion in assets. This ETF tracks the NASDAQ Index. While The NASDAQ is not explicitly a tech index, QQQ may actually provide the broadest diversification to what was previously “tech” after the aforementioned sector restructuring. At the time of writing, the fund has sector exposures of 48% Technology, 20% Communication, and 17% Consumer Discretionary. This gets you access to all the Big Tech players in one single fund – Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Netflix, and more. This ETF has an expense ratio of %.

FDN – First Trust Dow Jones Internet Index Fund

Prefer to specifically target internet companies like Amazon, Facebook, Paypal, Google, Netflix, and Twitter? The First Trust Dow Jones Internet Index Fund has become extremely popular in recent years due to the success of these companies; it has over $10 billion in assets. The fund was established in , has 42 holdings, and seeks to track the Dow Jones Internet Composite Index. This narrower targeting comes at a price; this ETF has an expense ratio of %.

ARKK – ARK Innovation ETF

ARKK is an actively managed ETF from ARK Invest, led by Catherine Wood. The firm has an impressive track record in recent years for beating the market with their focus on technology stocks. ARKK focuses on “disruptive innovation,” defined by ARK as “the introduction of a technologically enabled new product or service that potentially changes the way the world works.” This includes things like genomics, automation, energy, internet, and fintech (financial tech). Notable holdings in its typical range of companies include Tesla, Square, LendingTree, Zillow, Spotify, Facebook, and more. This ETF does provide a small amount of international exposure at about 6%, though most of its holdings are in the U.S. ARKK has over $8 billion in assets and an expense ratio of %.

Where to Buy These Tech ETFs

All these tech ETFs should be available at any major broker. My choice is M1 Finance for U.S. investors. The broker has zero trade commissions and zero account fees, and offers fractional shares, dynamic rebalancing, and a modern, user-friendly interface and mobile app. I wrote a comprehensive review of M1 Finance here.

Canadians can find the above ETFs on Questrade or Interactive Brokers. Investors outside North America can use eToro or possibly Interactive Brokers.


Disclosures:  None.

Interested in more Lazy Portfolios? See the full list here.

Disclaimer:  While I love diving into investing-related data and playing around with backtests, I am in no way a certified expert. I have no formal financial education. I am not a financial advisor, portfolio manager, or accountant. This is not financial advice, investing advice, or tax advice. The information on this website is for informational and recreational purposes only. Investment products discussed (ETFs, mutual funds, etc.) are for illustrative purposes only. It is not a recommendation to buy, sell, or otherwise transact in any of the products mentioned. Do your own due diligence. Past performance does not guarantee future returns. Read my lengthier disclaimer here.

m1 finance get started
Sours: https://www.optimizedportfolio.com/best-tech-etfs/
  1. Hp bios advanced settings
  2. The masterpiece creepypasta
  3. Roblox showcase ideas

9 Best Vanguard ETFs to Buy in

Vanguard is renowned for its mix of high-quality, low-cost, mostly passively managed mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

The association is so profound that devotees of passive index investing are informally known as Bogleheads after Vanguard founder John Bogle. Throughout his long career at Vanguard&#;s helm, Bogle never deviated from his mission to keep more of his clients’ money in the market and out of his fund managers’ hands.

And that he did. According to data compiled by Vanguard, the average Vanguard mutual fund and ETF expense ratio is 83% lower than the industry average today. Over time, the savings add up.

Compared with the industry average, Vanguard investors save more than $35, in fees over 30 years on an initial investment of just $50,, according to a Vanguard analysis.

It’s no surprise that Vanguard funds remain top of mind for do-it-yourself investors committed to building diversified portfolios with a mix of low-fee, passively managed mutual funds and ETFs.

(For investors with at least $50, in investable assets and less comfort with DIY investing, its Vanguard Personal Advisor Services is an affordable alternative to an independent human advisor.)

The list that follows focuses on the very best sector and index ETFs Vanguard has to offer.

Best Vanguard Funds (ETFs) for Retail Investors

If you have a tax-advantaged or taxable brokerage account — Vanguard or otherwise — with a self-directed investing option, you likely have access to the best Vanguard funds on the market.

And if your current online stock broker doesn’t offer Vanguard funds, there’s no cost to open a self-directed account with Vanguard.

What follows is a list of the best Vanguard ETFs for DIY retail investors — those building portfolios without help from a licensed financial advisor.

Each listing notes the instrument’s expense ratio (total operating expenses) and five-year return as of Q2 Compare these figures to comparable instruments offered by other fund issuers, such as Fidelity and Charles Schwab, both of which are known for low expense ratios.

Each listing also notes Vanguard’s proprietary “risk potential” score, which measures the risk of principal loss and growth on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the riskiest. Funds composed primarily of stocks are higher-risk than funds that primarily include bonds and other fixed-income instruments.

One final note: Most of these ETFs are available as Vanguard index funds (mutual funds), usually with investment minimums of $3, If you can meet the minimum investment and don&#;t mind waiting until the next trading session for your orders to fill, consult your financial advisor about investing in those instruments instead of these.

Pro tip: Have you considered hiring a financial advisor but don’t want to pay the high fees? Enter Vanguard Personal Advisor Services. When you sign up, you’ll work closely with an advisor to create a custom investment plan that can help you meet your financial goals. Learn More about Vanguard Personal Advisor Services.


1. Total Stock Market ETF (VTI)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 4

The Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF (VTI) is also available as a mutual fund, but the ETF version is a better fit for investors who can’t meet the $3, mutual fund minimum.

As the name suggests, it’s designed to match the performance of a broad swathe of equities — specifically, the CRSP U.S. Total Market Index, which includes a mix of small-, mid-, and large-cap growth and value stocks.

VTI remains fully invested, meaning it holds minimal cash at any given time and is not insulated from the ups and downs of the market in any way. While that’s not ideal for cautious investors, VTI is a mainstay of more aggressive portfolios seeking exposure to the broader U.S. stock market.

VTI is also available as a mutual fund (index fund): Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX).

Pro tip: Are you looking for ways to diversify your investment portfolio? Fundrise and Groundfloor give you the opportunity to invest indirectly in real estate. If you&#;re an accredited investor, Crowdstreet is another option.


2. Total Bond Market ETF (BND)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 2

The Vanguard Total Bond Market ETF (BND) is VTI’s bond market equivalent.

Designed to track the performance of a broad index of taxable investment-grade bonds, it excludes tax-exempt bonds (such as bonds issued by state governments and municipalities) and inflation-protected bonds (Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities).

BND has a wide range of use cases and is an integral component of a diversified portfolio, even those with relatively aggressive goals.

Vanguard recommends using BND as a hedge against stock market risk — basically, a counterweight to ETFs and funds like VTI, which tend to be more volatile. Otherwise, BND is appropriate for investors with moderate to long time horizons and lower tolerance for market risk.

BND is also available as a bond index fund: Vanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VBTLX).


3. Vanguard Total International Stock ETF (VXUS)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 5

The Vanguard Total International Stock ETF (VXUS) tracks the performance of the FTSE Global All Cap ex U.S. Index, which matches the performance of a broad basket of companies based outside the United States.

Its component firms hail from a mixture of developed and emerging markets, limiting regional risk and ensuring access to high- and low-growth economies alike.

VXUS hasn’t performed incredibly well over the past few years — a state of affairs that probably says more about the relative strength of the U.S. equities markets during that time than the composition of the fund itself.

Over longer periods, VXUS offers valuable diversification for U.S.-based investors seeking exposure to markets whose fates aren’t directly tied to the U.S. economy’s.

VXUS is also available as an index fund: Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTIAX).


4. Vanguard S&P ETF (VOO)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 4

The Vanguard S&P ETF (VOO) tracks the performance of the S&P stock index, a basket of the largest U.S.-based companies by market capitalization and a closely watched indicator of overall U.S. economic strength.

Like the underlying index, VOO is quite volatile, so it’s not appropriate for conservative investors with short time horizons and little tolerance for principal loss.

That said, it’s an essential complement to VTI, the mid- and small-cap components of which make for even greater volatility. Vanguard recommends VOO to long-term investors who can stomach near-term price drops.

VOO is also available as an index fund: Vanguard Index Fund Admiral Shares (VFIAX).


5. Vanguard Russell ETF (VTWO)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 5

The Vanguard Russell ETF (VTWO) tracks the performance of the Russell index, a broad basket of small U.S.-based companies.

The Russell (also known as the Russell 2K) is famously volatile, so VTWO isn’t for the faint of heart (or investors with short time horizons and a low tolerance for risk more generally).

But VTWO is absolutely a low-cost way for more aggressive investors to ensure exposure to high-growth companies during economic booms.

VTWO is not available as an index fund.


6. Vanguard Large-Cap ETF (VV)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 4

The Vanguard Large-Cap ETF (VV) tracks the performance of the CRSP U.S. Large Cap Index, which encompasses a broad basket of mostly large companies based in the U.S., such as Apple (AAPL) and Facebook (FB).

VV&#;s performance is similar, though not identical, to the performance of the S&P index and Vanguard’s VOO ETF, so it’s not clear you’d seek exposure to VV if you’ve already added VOO to your portfolio (or vice versa).

That said, if you’re looking for an alternative large-cap basket that’s fate isn’t directly tied to the S&P index’s, VV could be a better fit. Many of the components have high dividend yields.

VV is also available as an index fund: Vanguard Large-Cap Index Fund Admiral Shares (VLCAX).


7. Vanguard Mid-Cap ETF (VO)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 5

The Vanguard Mid-Cap ETF (VO) tracks the CRSP U.S. Mid Cap Index, a broad basket of mid-cap stocks (midsize companies) in a range of industries and sectors.

Mid-cap stocks tend to be more volatile than large-cap stocks and less volatile than small-cap stocks — a healthy medium for those seeking higher growth than large-cap funds typically provide without the whiplash inherent in small-cap funds.

In a diversified portfolio, VO is a nice complement to VV and VTWO.

VO is also available as an index fund: Vanguard Mid-Cap Index Fund Admiral Shares (VIMAX).


8. Vanguard Real Estate ETF (VNQ)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 4

The Vanguard Real Estate ETF (VNQ) tracks the performance of the MSCI U.S. Investable Market Real Estate 25/50 Index, a basket of stocks in the U.S. real estate sector. It&#;s a good stand-in for investments in more narrowly tailored real estate investment trusts, or REITs.

Fund components typically buy and hold commercial real estate properties, such as office buildings, retail properties, and hotels, across the U.S.

VNQ’s geographical diversity insulates it from regional economic trends but can’t do much about its exposure to macroeconomic risk, as recessions tend to be bad for the U.S. real estate market writ large.

That said, VNQ’s performance is not closely correlated with broader movements in U.S. equities outside real estate, so it’s a useful counterweight to funds like VO and VV. Its performance is more closely correlated with U.S. REITs&#;.

VNQ is also available as a mutual fund: Vanguard Real Estate Index Fund Admiral Shares (VGSLX).


9. Vanguard Growth ETF (VUG)

  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Five-Year Return: %
  • Risk Potential: 4

The Vanguard Growth ETF (VUG) mirrors the performance of the CRSP US Large Cap Growth Index, a basket of mostly large companies with high growth potential (growth stocks such as Amazon, Facebook, and Microsoft).

Because of its growth focus, VUG has performed very well relative to most other sector ETFs during the past few years and even held up well during the pandemic panic-induced stock market plunge of early

However, there’s no guarantee the party will last.

VUG is also available as an index fund: Vanguard Growth Index Fund Admiral Shares (VIGAX).


Final Word

Millions of satisfied clients would agree that Vanguard deserves its reputation as a low-cost, investor-friendly investment house. But investors — novices and experts alike — need to be realistic about the potential risks of investing with Vanguard too.

These risks aren’t unique to Vanguard. Investing in market-traded instruments always involves the risk of principal loss, and past performance is never a perfect predictor of future returns.

Always invest in accordance with your risk tolerance and financial objectives, and if you’re not sure how to assess either or both, consult a licensed financial advisor.

Sours: https://www.moneycrashers.com/best-vanguard-etfs-funds/
Top 5 Vanguard ETFs to Buy and Hold (2021)

Best ETFs to buy in

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) allow investors to buy a collection of stocks or other assets in just one fund with (usually) low expenses, and they trade on an exchange like stocks. ETFs have become tremendously popular in the last decade and now hold trillions of dollars in assets. With literally thousands of ETFs to choose from, where does an investor start? And with the stock market rising furiously after an initial plunge as part of the coronavirus crisis, what are the best ETFs to buy? Below are some of the top ETFs by category, including some highly specialized funds.

Best ETFs for

How to choose the right type of ETF for you

Equity ETFs

Bond ETFs

Balanced ETFs

Commodity ETFs

Currency ETFs

Real estate ETFs

Volatility ETFs

Leveraged ETFs

Inverse ETFs

Top Equity ETFs

Equity ETFs provide exposure to a portfolio of publicly traded stocks, and may be divided into several categories by where the stock is listed, the size of the company, whether it pays a dividend or what sector it&#x;s in. So investors can find the kind of stock funds they want exposure to and buy only stocks that meet certain criteria.

Stock ETFs tend to be more volatile than other kinds of investments such as CDs or bonds, but they&#x;re suitable for long-term investors looking to build wealth. Some of the most popular equity ETF sectors and their returns (as of July 26) include:

Top U.S. market-cap index ETFs

Vanguard S&P ETF(VOO)

This kind of ETF gives investors broad exposure to publicly traded companies listed on American exchanges using a passive investment approach that tracks a major index such as the S&P or Nasdaq

Vanguard S&P ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years):  percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs in this group also include SPDR S&P ETF Trust (SPY), iShares Core S&P ETF (IVV) and Invesco QQQ Trust (QQQ).

Top International ETFs

Vanguard FTSE Developed Markets ETF (VEA)

This kind of ETF can provide targeted exposure to international publicly traded companies broadly or by more specific geographic area, such as Asia, Europe or emerging markets. Investing in foreign companies introduces concerns such as currency risk and governance risks, since foreign countries may not offer the same protections for investors as the U.S. does.

Vanguard FTSE Developed Markets ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs also include iShares Core MSCI EAFE ETF (IEFA), Vanguard FTSE Emerging Markets ETF (VWO) and Vanguard Total International Stock ETF (VXUS).

Top Sector ETFs

Vanguard Information Technology ETF (VGT)

This kind of ETF gives investors a way to buy stock in specific industries, such as consumer staples, energy, financials, healthcare, technology and more. These ETFs are typically passive, meaning they track a specific preset index of stocks and simply mechanically follow the index.

Vanguard Information Technology ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs also include Financial Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLF), Energy Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLE) and Industrial Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLI).

Dividend ETFs

Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF (VIG)

This kind of ETF gives investors a way to buy only stocks that pay a dividend. A dividend ETF is usually passively managed, meaning it mechanically tracks an index of dividend-paying firms. This kind of ETF is usually more stable than a total market ETF, and it may be attractive to those looking for investments that produce income, such as retirees.

The best dividend ETFs tends to offer higher returns and low cost.

Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs here also include) Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index ETF (VYM) and Schwab U.S. Dividend Equity ETF (SCHD).

Top bond ETFs

A bond ETF provides exposure to a portfolio of bonds, which are often divided into sub-sectors depending on bond type, their issuer, maturity and other factors, allowing investors to buy exactly the kind of bonds they want. Bonds pay out interest on a schedule, and the ETF passes this income on to holders.

Bond ETFs can be an attractive holding for those needing the safety of regular income, such as retirees. Some of the most popular bond ETF sectors and their returns (as of July 26) include:

Long-term bond ETFs

iShares MBS ETF (MBB)

This kind of bond ETF gives exposure to bonds with a long maturity, perhaps as long as 30 years out. Long-term bond ETFs are most exposed to changes in interest rates, so if rates move higher or lower, these ETFs will move inversely to the direction of rates. While these ETFs may pay a higher yield than shorter-term bond ETFs, many don&#x;t see the reward as worthy of the risk.

iShares MBS ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs also include iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT) and Vanguard Mortgage-Backed Securities ETF (VMBS).

Short-term bond ETFs

Vanguard Short-Term Bond ETF (BSV)

This kind of bond ETF gives exposure to bonds with a short maturity, typically no more than a few years. These bond ETFs won&#x;t move much in response to changes to interest rates, meaning they&#x;re relatively low risk. These ETFs can be a more attractive option than owning the bonds directly because the fund is highly liquid and more diversified than any individual bond.

Vanguard Short-Term Bond ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs in this category also include iShares Year Treasury Bond ETF (SHY) and Vanguard Short-Term Treasury ETF (VGSH).

Total bond market ETFs

Vanguard Total Bond Market ETF (BND)

This kind of bond ETF gives investors exposure to a wide selection of bonds, diversified by type, issuer, maturity and region. A total bond market ETF provides a way to gain broad bond exposure without going too heavy in one direction, making it a way to diversify a stock-heavy portfolio.

Vanguard Total Bond Market ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs also include iShares Core U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF (AGG) and Vanguard Total International Bond ETF (BNDX).

Municipal bond ETFs

iShares National Muni Bond ETF (MUB)

This kind of bond ETF gives exposure to bonds issued by states and cities, and interest on these bonds is typically tax-free, though it&#x;s lower than that paid by other issuers. Muni bonds have traditionally been one of the safest areas of the bond market, though if you own out-of-state munis in a fund, you will lose the tax benefits in your home state, though not at the federal level. Given the tax advantages, it is advantageous to consider a municipal bond ETF that invests in your state of residence.

iShares National Muni Bond ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held ETFs also include Vanguard Tax-Exempt Bond ETF (VTEB) and iShares Short-Term National Muni Bond ETF (SUB).

Top balanced ETFs

iShares Core Aggressive Allocation ETF (AOA)

A balanced ETF owns both stock and bonds, and it targets a certain exposure to stock, which is often reflected in its name. These funds allow investors to have the long-term returns of stocks while reducing some of the risk with bonds, which tend to be more stable. A balanced ETF may be more suitable for long-term investors  who may be a bit more conservative but need growth in their portfolio.

iShares Core Aggressive Allocation ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held balanced ETFs also include iShares Core Growth Allocation ETF (AOR) and iShares Core Moderate Allocation ETF (AOM).

Top commodity ETFs

SPDR Gold Shares (GLD)

A commodity ETF gives investors a way to own specific commodities, including agricultural goods, oil, precious metals and others without having to transact in the futures markets. The ETF may own the commodity directly or via futures contracts. Commodities tend to be quite volatile, so they may not be well-suited for all investors. However, these ETFs may allow more advanced investors to diversify their holdings, hedge out exposure to a given commodity in their other investments or make a directional bet on the price of a given commodity. The best-performing gold ETFs tend to offer highly effective portfolio diversification with added defensive stores of value.

SPDR Gold Shares ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held commodities ETFs also include iShares Silver Trust (SLV), United States Oil Fund LP (USO) and Invesco DB Agriculture Fund (DBA).

Top currency ETFs

Invesco DB US Dollar Index Bullish Fund (UUP)

A currency ETF gives investors exposure to a specific currency by simply buying an ETF rather than accessing the foreign exchange (forex) markets. Investors can gain access to some of the world&#x;s most widely traded currencies, including the U.S. Dollar, the Euro, the British Pound, the Swiss Franc, the Japanese Yen and more. These ETFs are more suitable for advanced investors who may be seeking a way to hedge out exposure to a specific currency in their other investments or to simply make a directional bet on the value of a currency.

Invesco DB US Dollar Index Bullish Fund Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held currency ETFs also include Invesco CurrencyShares Euro Trust (FXE) and Invesco CurrencyShares Swiss Franc Trust (FXF).

Top real estate ETFs (REIT ETFs)

Vanguard Real Estate ETF (VNQ)

Real estate ETFs usually focus on holding stocks classified as REITs, or real estate investment trusts. REITs are a convenient way to own an interest in companies that own and manage real estate, and REITs operate in many sectors of the market, including residential, commercial, industrial, lodging, cell towers, medical buildings and more. REITs typically pay out substantial dividends, which are then passed on to the holders of the ETF. These payouts make REITs and REIT ETFs particularly popular among those who need income, especially retirees. The best ETF REITs maximize dividend yields, as dividends are the main reason for investing in them.

Vanguard Real Estate ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held real estate ETFs also include iShare U.S. Real Estate ETF (IYR) and Schwab U.S. REIT ETF (SCHH).

Top volatility ETFs

iPath Series B S&P VIX Short-Term Futures (VXX)

ETFs even allow investors to bet on the volatility of the stock market through what are called volatility ETFs. Volatility is measured by the CBOE Volatility Index, commonly known as the VIX. Volatility usually rises when the market is falling and investors become uneasy, so a volatility ETF can be a way to hedge your investment in the market, helping to protect it. Because of how they&#x;re structured, they&#x;re best-suited for traders looking for short-term moves in the market, not long-term investors looking to profit from a rise in volatility.

iPath Series B S&P VIX Short-Term Futures Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 3 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held volatility ETFs also include the ProShares VIX Mid-Term Futures ETF (VIXM) and the ProShares Short VIX Short-Term Futures ETF (SVXY).

Top leveraged ETFs

ProShares UltraPro QQQ (TQQQ)

A leveraged ETF goes up in value more rapidly than the index it&#x;s tracking, and a leveraged ETF may target a gain that&#x;s two or even three times higher than the daily return on its index. For example, a triple leveraged ETF based on the S&P should rise 3 percent on a day the index rises 1 percent. A double leveraged ETF would target a double return. Because of how leveraged ETFs are structured, they&#x;re best-suited for traders looking for short-term returns on the target index over a few days, rather than long-term investors.

ProShares UltraPro QQQ ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held leveraged ETFs also include ProShares Ultra QQQ (QLD), Direxion Daily Semiconductor Bull 3x Shares (SOXL) and ProShares Ultra S&P (SSO).

Top inverse ETFs

ProShares Short S&P ETF (SH)

Inverse ETFs go up in value when the market declines, and they allow investors to buy one fund that inversely tracks a specific index such as the S&P or Nasdaq These ETFs may target the exact inverse performance of the index, or they may try to offer two or three times the performance, like a leveraged ETF. For example, if the S&P fell 2 percent in a day, a triple inverse should rise about 6 percent that day. Because of how they&#x;re structured, inverse ETFs are best-suited for traders looking to capitalize on short-term declines in an index.

ProShares Short S&P ETF Performance:

  • performance: percent
  • Historical performance (annual over 5 years): percent
  • Expense ratio: percent

Some of the most widely held inverse ETFs also include ProShares UltraPro Short QQQ (SQQQ) and ProShares UltraShort S&P (SDS).

How ETFs work

An exchange-traded fund is an investment fund that trades on a stock exchange. ETFs may hold positions in many different assets, including stocks, bonds and sometimes commodities.

ETFs most often track a specific index such as the Standard & Poor&#x;s or the Nasdaq , meaning it holds positions in the index companies at their same relative weights in the index.

So by buying one share in the ETF, an investor effectively purchases a (tiny) share in all the assets held in the fund.

Sours: https://www.bankrate.com/investing/best-etfs/

Tech etf vanguard best

Best Tech ETFs So Far This Year

The S&P is up more than 25% year to date. At the same time, tech stocks remain one of the hottest portions of the market—continuing a trend that in September caused the S&P Dow Jones Indices to relocate 23 popular tech heavyweight stocks to a newly created communications services sector.

Tech-focused exchange-traded funds (ETFs) have been riding the highs of this powerful sector. The top tech ETFs have dramatically outperformed the S&P so far this year, with double-digit gains a hallmark of the space. Let's explore two of the top tech ETFs based on year-to-date performance, as well as a newcomer that may take advantage of the communications services sector shift.

All information is current as of Nov. 30,

key takeaways

  • Technology stocks remain one of the market's hottest performing sectors, and tech-focused ETFs are a good way for retail investors to play.
  • Two of the largest and best-known tech ETFs are Technology Select Sector SPDR and Vanguard Information Technology ETF.
  • A third ETF, the Communications Services Select Sector SPDR Fund, was formed to exploit the S&P re-classification of some companies into a new communications services sector in

Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLK)

The Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund is one of the largest tech-centered ETFs. With $ billion in net assets under management (AUM), XLK sports an average daily volume of million and an expense ratio of %. This ETF offers broad exposure to the U.S. technology sector. It generally does not include small-cap or many mid-cap companies, helping it to reduce volatility, according to ETF.com.

Considering that XLK is relatively cheap (a net asset value of $88), sizable and highly liquid, along with its YTD return of %, the fund is a smart buy for any tech-focused ETF investor.

Vanguard Information Technology ETF (VGT)

The Vanguard Information Technology ETF is "one of the most diverse market-cap-weighted technology ETFs available," per ETF.com. Unlike XLK, VGT includes small- and micro-cap stocks in its AUM basket of $ billion. Nonetheless, it enjoys high liquidity (its average trading volume is ,). With a net expense ratio of %, it also keeps all-in costs quite low for investors.

VGT has returned % YTD.

Because the tech giants Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google, known by the acronym FANG, were all reclassified into the S&P's new communications services sector, financial pundits joked the old technology sector had been "de-FANGed."

Communications Services Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLC)

One of the newest ETFs exploring in this area, the Communications Services Select Sector SPDR Fund was launched in June in response to the upcoming changes to tech equities' sector classifications. XLC includes all the members of the former telecom sector, plus media and entertainment companies. This means that XLC's basket includes some highly popular "tech" names as well as stocks in related sectors.

Nearly a year and a half old, XLC sports just over $6 billion in AUM, and maintains an expense ratio of %. It has returned % year to date, and is the "bargain" of our group, with a NAV of $ currently.

The Bottom Line

While tech ETFs have been massively successful so far this year, that's no reason for investors to get complacent. Watch these ETFs carefully, as their performance can be volatile.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/investing/best-tech-etfs-so-far-year/
Best Tech ETF -- Huge 1,000% Gains! -- (QQQ, VGT, OGIG)

3 Tech ETFs That Could Make You a Multimillionaire

It's possible to become a multimillionaire by investing in the stock market, but you'll need to choose the right investments. Not all stocks are created equal, and some are better options than others.

Investing in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) is a smart way to diversify your investments, because you're investing in dozens or hundreds of stocks at once. There are different types of ETFs, though, including broad-market funds and niche funds.

Broad-market funds, like S&P ETFs, include stocks from a wide variety of industries. They tend to be lower risk, but they also experience lower returns, on average. Niche ETFs only contain stocks from a particular industry. They have the potential to earn higher-than-average returns, but they also carry more risk.

Investing in tech-focused ETFs can help you earn higher returns while still limiting your risk. ETFs are generally lower risk than investing in individual stocks, and the tech sector is known for its explosive growth. If you're eager to invest in tech stocks, there are a few tech ETFs that can help you make a lot of money.

Large pile of assorted bills

Image source: Getty Images.

1. Vanguard Information Technology ETF (VGT)

The Vanguard Information Technology ETF(NYSEMKT:VGT) contains stocks from the U.S. technology sector, with a few of its largest holdings including Apple, Microsoft, and NVIDIA.

The fund was established in , so it has a relatively long track record. Since its inception, it has earned an average rate of return of around 13% per year. If your goal is to accumulate at least $2 million, you'd need to invest just over $ per month for 30 years while earning a 13% annual return.

Of course, 30 years is a long time to wait. But ETFs are low-maintenance investments, so all you have to do is invest consistently and leave your money alone for as long as possible. With enough patience, you can save a significant amount of money with little to no effort.

2. Invesco S&P Equal Weight Technology ETF (RYT)

The Invesco S&P Equal Weight Technology ETF(NYSEMKT:RYT) includes 76 stocks that are in the information technology sector of the S&P While this fund has fewer holdings and doesn't provide as much diversification, the S&P contains some of the strongest companies in the U.S. -- which can limit your risk.

Since the fund's inception in , it has earned an average rate of return of around 14% per year. To earn at least $2 million in total savings, you'd need to save around $ per month for 30 years while earning a 14% annual return.

3. SPDR S&P Software & Services ETF (XSW)

The SPDR S&P Software & Services ETF(NYSEMKT:XSW) includes stocks, and it tracks the software and services segment of the S&P Total Market Index -- which includes sub-industries such as application software, data processing, and IT consulting.

This ETF is younger than the other two on the list, as it was established in However, it's also earned higher returns, with an average rate of return of around 22% per year since its inception. At that rate, you'd need to save around $ per month for 30 years to accumulate $2 million.

Keep in mind, though, that because this fund doesn't have an extensive track record, there are no guarantees you'll see returns this high over the long run. All niche ETFs are riskier than broad-market funds, and your investments could experience higher levels of volatility.

Building a balanced portfolio

If you choose to invest in any tech ETF, it's important to make sure the rest of your portfolio is well-diversified. In other words, don't invest all your money into a single ETF -- especially a niche ETF.

Once you have a solid core portfolio, putting some money behind a tech ETF could give your investments a boost. With enough time and patience, these funds could help you become a multimillionaire.

Sours: https://www.fool.com/investing//04/18/3-tech-etfs-that-could-make-you-a-multimillionaire/

Now discussing:

Best Tech ETFs for Q4

The technology sector includes companies focused on the research, development, and sale of a broad range of hardware and software used by consumers and businesses. It includes giants such as Apple Inc. (AAPL), Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), and Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN), as well as many fast-growing younger companies. The sector has been a major driver of overall gains in the stock market.

Key Takeaways

  • The tech sector slightly underperformed the broader market over the past year.
  • The ETFs with the best 1-year trailing total return are BLOK, PSI, and PRNT.
  • The top holdings of these ETFs are class A shares of MicroStrategy Inc., Advanced Micro Devices Inc., and ExOne Co., respectively.

There are 70 distinct technology ETFs that trade in the U.S., excluding inverse and leveraged ETFs, as well as funds with less than $50 million in assets under management (AUM). The technology sector, as measured by the S&P Information Technology Sector Index, has slightly underperformed the broader market with a total return of % over the past 12 months compared to the S&P 's total return of %, as of Aug. 30, The best-performing technology ETF, based on performance over the past year, is the Amplify Transformational Data Sharing ETF (BLOK). We examine the top 3 best tech ETFs below. All numbers below are as of Aug. 31,

Amplify Transformational Data Sharing ETF (BLOK)

  • Performance over 1-Year: %
  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Annual Dividend Yield: %
  • 3-Month Average Daily Volume: ,
  • Assets Under Management: $ billion
  • Inception Date: Jan. 17,
  • Issuer: Amplify Investments

BLOK is an actively managed ETF that invests at least 80% of its assets in stocks of companies that are actively engaged in the development and utilization of blockchain technologies. Blockchain technology is a type of distributed ledger technology underpinning many cryptocurrencies. The vast majority of the fund's holdings are based in North America and over half operate within the software and services sector of the economy. It follows a blended strategy, investing in a mix of both growth and value stocks across the market cap spectrum. The fund's top three holdings include class A shares of MicroStrategy Inc. (MSTR), a provider of enterprise software platforms; Hut 8 Mining Corp. (HUT:TSE), a Canada-based bitcoin mining and blockchain infrastructure company; and Marathon Digital Holdings Inc. (MARA), a digital asset company which mines cryptocurrencies worldwide.

Invesco Dynamic Semiconductors ETF (PSI)

  • 1-Year Trailing Total Returns: %
  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Annual Dividend Yield: %
  • 3-Month Average Daily Volume: 37,
  • Assets Under Management: $ million
  • Inception Date: June 23,
  • Issuing Company: Invesco

PSI is a multi-cap fund that targets growth semiconductor stocks. The fund tracks the stock Dynamic Semiconductors Intellidex Index. The multi-cap ETF normally invests 90% of its total assets in stocks in the index. PSI focuses entirely on U.S. stocks. The ETF's top holdings are Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD), a multinational semiconductor manufacturer; Qualcomm Inc. (QCOM), a wireless services, semiconductor, and software company; and Broadcom Inc. (AVGO), a maker of semiconductor and infrastructure software products.

3D Printing ETF (PRNT)

  • Performance over 1-Year: %
  • Expense Ratio: %
  • Annual Dividend Yield: N/A
  • 3-Month Average Daily Volume: 91,
  • Assets Under Management: $ million
  • Inception Date: July 19,
  • Issuer: ARK

PRNT follows the Total 3D-Printing Index, which targets companies in the burgeoning 3D printing industry in the U.S., non-U.S. developed markets, and Taiwan. Companies in the benchmark are involved in 3D printing hardware, computer aided design and 3D printing simulation software, 3D printing centers, scanning and measurement, and 3D printing materials. The top holdings of this fund include ExOne Co. (XONE), a provider of industrial 3D printing systems and services; 3D Systems Corp. (DDD), a maker of 3D printers, 3D printing materials, and 3D scanners; and SLM Solutions Group AG (AM3D:ETR), a German maker of 3D metal printers.

The comments, opinions and analyses expressed herein are for informational purposes only and should not be considered individual investment advice or recommendations to invest in any security or to adopt any investment strategy. While we believe the information provided herein is reliable, we do not warrant its accuracy or completeness. The views and strategies described on our content may not be suitable for all investors. Because market and economic conditions are subject to rapid change, all comments, opinions, and analyses contained within our content are rendered as of the date of the posting and may change without notice. The material is not intended as a complete analysis of every material fact regarding any country, region, market, industry, investment, or strategy.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/top-performing-information-technology-etfs-of


829 830 831 832 833